Topics - Helicopters in the Korean War

 
Close this window
 

[Most recent update to this page: December 03, 2019]

 

Introduction

Whether to medivac the wounded or transport troops from Point A to Point B, U.S. helicopters played a significant role during the official Korean War "period of war" (6/27/1950-1/31/1955) and post-war Korea.  To add information to this page of the KWE, contact Lynnita@thekwe.org.


Page Contents

  • Types of Helicopters Used in Korea
    • Army
      • Bell H-13 Sioux
      • Hiller H-23 Raven
      • H-19 Chickasaw
    • Marine Corps
      • H-19 Chickasaw
    • Air Force
      • H-5
  • Korean War Firsts
  • Army Narrative written by Dr. Kaylene Hughes
  • Helicopter Crew Fatalities during the Korean War
  • Post-Korean War Helicopter Crew Fatalities in Korea
  • Post-Korean War Helicopter Crew Fatalities (out of theater)

Types of Helicopters Used in Korea - Army

  • Bell H-13 Sioux
  • Hiller H-23 Raven
  • H-19C Chickasaw
  • H-19D Chickasaw

Types of Helicopters Used in Korea - Marine Corps

  • H-19 Chickasaw

Types of Helicopters Used in Korea - Air Force

  • H-5 - These vintage World War II helicopters were used by the 3rd Air Rescue Squadron in the early days, weeks and months of the Korean War.

    "In the early months of the Korean conflict, following the invasion of South Korea in June 1950, a helicopter detachment of the 3rd Air Rescue Squadron, USAF, had the mission of rescuing United Nations pilots downed over water or behind enemy lines using their WW II vintage H-5 helicopters. 3rd Air Rescue received occasional requests from ground elements to air evacuate casualties from difficult terrain, and when they had time, they responded.  By August 1950, they were answering so many calls they found themselves formally in the medical evacuation business." [Source: website Olive Drab]

Korean War Firsts

[The information for this section came from the Rotorheads website.]

  • July 25, 1950 - H-5H #49-2006 was the first helicopter lost in Korea. 1st Lt.'s Kenneth G. Blurton and John R. Halpin flew an H-5 to pick up a Navy pilot in Penseng area, which, unknown to them, was enemy occupied. Pilots landed with insufficient fuel to return. All 3 pilots escaped and evaded and were rescued on 29 July 1950, leaving the H-5 behind, which was later destroyed by Navy fighters.
     
  • August 05, 1950 - An H-5 from Det. F, 3rd ARS operating from Pusan, Korea, made the first recorded use of an H-5 for medical evacuation transported U. S. Army soldier Pfc. Claude C. Crest, Jr., from the Sendang-ni area to an Army hospital. "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion
     
  • September 04, 1950 - In the first H-5 helicopter rescue of a downed US pilot from behind enemy lines in Korea, at Hanggan-dong, Lt. Paul W. Van Boven (P) and Cpl. John Fuentes (M) saved F-51D pilot Capt. Robert E. Wayne. Air Force Magazine & "That Others May Live" by Forrest L. Marion
     
  • October 10, 1950 - An H-5 from the 3rd ARS crewed by 1st Lt. David C. McDanial (P) and Capt. John C. Shumate (Para-Doctor) picked up a downed British pilot, Lt. Stan W. Leonard and administered blood plasma, for the first time while a helicopter was in flight. The crew members received Silver Stars for this action. Air Force Magazine & "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion.
     
  • October 21-22, 1950 - H-5's of the 3rd ARS and two L-5"s, evacuated some 35 wounded paratroopers of the 187th Regimental Combat Team from a drop zone near Sukchon North Korea in the first use of a helicopter in support of an airborne operation. H-5's also evacuated seven American POW's from the area. Air Force Magazine & "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion.
     
  • November 05, 1950 - An H-5 of the 3rd ARS, piloted by Lt. Edward J. Kelly (TDY from the 2nd ARS), was attacked by two MiG-15's, but was not hit. This is the first air to air attack on a helicopter under combat conditions.
     
  • November 28, 1950 - H-5H #49-2009 crashed into a mountain about 25 miles north west of Pyongyang, Korea, in low visibility, darkness and low on fuel, returning to base after rescuing a F4U pilot from North Korea. Killed in the crash were 1st Lt. Robert B. Parker (P), Pfc. William G. Wilkerson (M) and Ens. William G. Wagner USN F4U-5P pilot. This was the first loss of USAF helicopter crew members in the Korean War. "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion.
     
  • March 24, 1951 - For the first time, Far East AF used a YH-19, a experimental service test under combat conditions helicopter, in Korea for the air evacuation of wounded troops. The H-19 was considerably larger and more powerful, with greater range, than the H-5's. The initial YH-19 personnel consisted of pilots Maj. Samuel B. Brown and Capt. Joseph D. Cooper and Crew Chief TSgt. Earl J. Paulsen and several mechanics. Air Force Magazine & "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion.
     
  • March 24-28, 1951 - For the first time, Far East Air Forces (FEAF) used an YH-19, a service test helicopter, in Korea for the air evacuation of wounded troops. Following Operation Tomahawk, the second airborne assult of the war, 3rd ARS Detachment YH-19 and H-5 helicopters evacuated 270 injured and wounded paratroopers of the 187th RCT from the Munsan-ni area twenty miles north of Seoul. Pilots and medics flew constantly during daylight, and maintenance crews worked around the clock in support of evacuations that often were conducted under heavy mortar artillery and small arms fire. "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion.
     
  • March 30-31, 1951 - A YH-19 was used on a "classified' mission to bring some 18 UN personnel, most likely involved the recovery of Korean guerrillas, from North Korea. This was the first use of this type helicopter in a special operations mission. "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion & "The USAF in Korea A Chronology 1950-1953" by A. Timothy Warnock.
     
  • September 13, 1951 - H-5G #48-555 crewed by 1st Lt. Eugene C. Kohfield (P) and Pfc. Lawrence A. Reid (M) was hit by enemy ground fire while attempting a rescue of a AT-6D Mosquito crew and crashed from about 200 feet as it was attempting to land back at its base, instantly killing Kohfield and Reid. This was the first loss of USAF helicopter crew members as a direct result of enemy fire. "That Others May Live, USAF Air Rescue in Korea" by Forrest L. Marion.
     
  • October 26, 1951 - Two H-5's of the 3rd ARS, one piloted by Col. John Dean, (Call sign "Pedro 02), who rescued Lt. Charles DuPont ("Pedro 09") by hoist and the other piloted by Capt. Bob Barnhill, (Call sign "Pedro 01"), who rescued 1st Lt. Vernon Wright ("Hammer") and Cpl. Gerald Fryer ("Pedro 09") by hoist, safety from the mountainside where they had hidden from Communist troops during the night. This was the first successful rescue of a downed rescue chopper crew in the Korean War. After the successful rescue the downed H-5 #48-556 was destroyed by the flight of South African Air Force F-51 fighters, call sign "Grenadier Love 01, 02, 03 & 04", that had been providing close air support coverage during this mission. Air Force Magazine & "Tails of a Helicopter Pilot" by Richard Kirkland.
     
  • December 27-31, 1952 - In its first recorded operations the 581st Air Resupply and Communication Wing (ARCW) flew off Cho-do and put these folks in well above Chinnampo on the mud flats. The flight of four H-19A helicopters, at Seoul, flew several experimental agent-insertion sorties into enemy territory for covert and clandestine intelligence activities including the insertion of South Korean agents behind enemy lines. Air Force Magazine & "The U.S. Air Force's First War: Korea 1950-1953 Significant Events" by A. Timothy Warnock






     

Army Narrative

Army Helicopters in Korea, 1950 to '53
written by Dr. Kaylene Hughes

WASHINGTON -- Despite acquisition difficulties caused by an inter-service rivalry with the U.S. Air Force and the technological immaturity of the U.S. helicopter industrial sector, Army Aviation's helicopters made significant life-saving contributions during the Korean War.

The Army helicopters initially deployed to Korea were the Bell H-13 Sioux and the Hiller H-23 Raven, the first in a long line of Army helicopters named for Native American tribes. The service had acquired the Sioux in 1946, but had just 56 in its inventory when North Korea invaded the south in June 1950.

The 2nd Helicopter Detachment arrived in theater in November 1950 with four Sioux aircraft. Among the early missions assigned to the unit were utility, wire laying, liaison, and reconnaissance missions.

In January 1951, four helicopter detachments were assigned to the 8th U.S. Army surgeon, and on the third day of that month, 1st Lt. Willis G. Shawn and 1st Lt. Joseph L. Bowler flew the first Army aerial medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) missions.

Dubbed the "Angel of Mercy" by Soldiers on the battlefront, the aviators used the H-13 to transport 18,000 of the war's total 23,000 casualties to forward deployed mobile Army surgical hospitals.

As the iconic symbol of the MEDEVAC mission during the Korean War, the H-13 Sioux helicopter became familiar to American television audiences years later when it was shown in the background title shot of the "M.A.S.H" series, which aired from 1972 to 1983.

Also supporting the MEDEVAC mission were a small number of Hiller H-23 Raven helicopters that arrived in theater in February 1951. In November 1952, the Army organized its first purely medical aviation unit: the 49th Medical Detachment (Air Ambulance).

Because of the hazards to which the primitive aircraft were subjected, particularly their vulnerability to enemy fire while on the ground, the 8th U.S. Army surgeon set limits on the use of helicopters, including restricting aerial MEDEVAC to only the most serious cases.

But pilots often ignored constraints like pickups only at MASH units or evacuations only during daylight hours in order to reach wounded Soldiers at night in isolated locations.

In addition, although the aviators had no formal training in casualty care, they became adept at improvising ways to move the wounded more safely and in greater comfort within the two exterior pods with which the Sioux and Raven helicopters were equipped.

The success of the MEDEVAC techniques pioneered by Army helicopter pilots was most dramatically revealed in the reduction in the death rate of evacuated patients before they reached medical facilities from 4.5 percent during World War II to 2.5 percent during the Korean War.

In addition to shortening the time it took for seriously wounded troops to reach treatment, the use of aerial MEDEVAC in Korea eased the extra stress placed on the remaining ground troops who had to carry and care for the sick and wounded not airlifted off the battlefield.

The accomplishments of the original Army helicopter pilots were first recognized in 1952 by the inception of the Solopilot Society, which honored the aviators who performed all the duties--pilot, medic and crew chief--of their individual aerial ambulances.

The second momentous development in the Army's use of helicopters in Korea occurred in July 1952, when the 6th Transportation Company (Helicopter) received the H-19 Chickasaw, the service's first true cargo and troop transport helicopter.

Capable of traveling faster and farther than the H-13 Sioux, the aircraft also held more cargo, could MEDEVAC four to six litters with one onboard nurse, or transport eight fully-equipped Soldiers. The unit began training on the aircraft at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Although the Army deployed its Chickasaws late in the Korean conflict compared to the U.S. Marine Corps' (USMC's) aircraft, the 6th Transportation Company began operations in theater in January 1953 and received its first mission in March of that year.

As part of Operation Terry Blue, the unit resupplied elements of the 3rd Infantry Division, which had been cut off from their supply chain by flood waters, airlifting almost 34,000 pounds of critically needed fuel, ammunition and food.

During Operation Sky Hook in May 1953, the 6th Transportation Company (Helicopter) joined the 13th Transportation Company to form the 1st Transportation Army Aviation Battalion (Provisional) to support the 25th Infantry Division by delivering essential food, water and other needed supplies.

Army rotary-wing cargo units teamed with USMC H-19 Chickasaws in June 1953 as part of the largest helicopter operation of the war with 45 aircraft transporting 800 Republic of Korea troops. Previously, in April 1953, the two services teamed up for Operation Little Switch, evacuating nearly 700 sick and wounded Allied prisoners of war.

In August 1953, the 6th Transportation Company (Helicopter) partnered again with the 13th Transportation detachment for Operation Big Switch, making more than 1,100 flights in a 33-day period to transfer 5,600 released American and Allied POWs from the exchange point at Panmunjom to freedom and safety in the south.

Not long after the ceasefire on July 27, 1953, Army helicopter pilots participated in Operation Broadway, helping to carry more than 5,000 Indian troops from aircraft carriers at Inchon to their new post in the re-established demilitarized zone, where they would monitor the ceasefire agreement.

Despite the aircraft's late arrival in theater, the Army's H-19 helicopters and pilots accomplished much by performing the service's first air assault missions in combat as well as assisting with MEDEVAC and critical resupply efforts.

Army aviation rotary-wing units overcame the serious obstacles caused by Korea's harsh terrain and weather, as well as enemy firepower, inadequate spare parts and lack of trained personnel.

Between January and July 1953, the 6th Transportation Company (Helicopter) flew over 4,000 hours, lifted 5 million pounds of supplies, transported 500 troops, and evacuated 1,400 sick and wounded Soldiers, with only one aircraft lost due to engine failure.

By bypassing the often severe limitations of land transportation, Army helicopter pilots demonstrated the enormous benefits of cargo lift and troop-carrying aviation, thereby influencing the formulation of the Army's emerging air mobility doctrine.

By 1955, according to an article published in the Redstone Rocket, organic aviation had become the fourth element of the Army's then-modern combat arms:

"Just as fixed-winged aircraft earned its place in the Army unit during World War II, helicopters earned their "wings" in Korea ...

"Why the emphasis on aircraft? On the battlefield of the future, operations will be dispersed, the combat zone will be deeper and operations will be much more fluid than past commanders could have visualized. In the battle zone, air transportation -- in quick response to the will of the commander -- will have the capacity to transport reserves and supplies to critical points ...

"However the aircraft are deployed -- wire-laying, bridge emplacement, supply or resupply, medical evacuation, smoke laying, reconnaissance, troop movement, courier, armor column control -- they take with them two American military traditions: To get there 'fustest with the mostest' and to 'hit 'em where they ain't.'

"They are the essence of the mobility upon which the Army of the future must rely for victory."


Helicopter Crew Fatalities during the Korean War (in & out of theater)

  • Koelsch, Lt. John Kelvin (Navy) -

    His helicopter rescue unit was on a rescue mission to retrieve downed USMC pilot James V. Wilkins when the helicopter he was piloting was hit by enemy fire and crashed into the side of a mountain in Korea.  Petty Officer 3C George Neal was also a volunteer for this mission, which took place on July 03, 1951.  The three men survived the crash but were taken captive and held as prisoners of war.  Neal and Wilkins were eventually repatriated, but Lieutenant Koelsch died in captivity in October 1951 of dysentery and malnutrition.  As the result of his actions in the rescue mission and immediately thereafter, Lieutenant Koelsch was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.
     
  • McCue, CDR Joseph F.  (Coast Guard) -

    McCue was commander of Bell HTL-1, 2460, a Coast Guard helicopter, on November 13, 1952.  En route to a practice landing site in Beverly, Massachusetts, the helicopter developed engine and control problems and crashed out of control in a residential area.  Commander McCue and his crewman, AD1 Henry J. White, were killed.
     
  • White, AD1 Henry J. (Coast Guard) -

    AD1 White was a crewman on  Bell HTL-1, 2460, a Coast Guard helicopter, on November 13, 1952.  En route to a practice landing site in Beverly, Massachusetts, the helicopter developed engine and control problems and crashed out of control in a residential area.  White and the aircraft commander were killed.

Post-Korean War Helicopter Crew Fatalities in Korea

March 2, 1977 - 4 killed

July 14, 1977 - 3 killed

  • Alfonso, Cpl. John A. - rifleman from Aztec, New MexicoOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Anglin, LCpl. Richard R. - rifleman from Redlands, CaliforniaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Beason Capt. Lawrence L. Jr. - One of four Marines killed in a CH-46 helicopter crash on March 17, 1989.  The helicopter crashed into a rice paddy near Toksok-Ri, South Korea while taking part in the annual "Team Spirit" exercises Captain Beason was born January 3, 1961, in Dallas. In 1979 he graduated from Jesuit College Preparatory School in Dallas. From 1979 to 1981 he attended Spring Hill College in Mobile, Ala., where he helped found the Spring Hill Oceanographic Research Society. He graduated from Texas A&M University at Galveston in 1983 with a bachelor of science degree in marine biology. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps in October 1983 and attended Marine Corps Basic School in Quantico, Va. He attended the U.S. Naval Flight Training Program in Pensacola, Fla., received his wings in May 1986 and was promoted to captain in the fall of 1988. Capt. Beason was attached to HMM-161 at the Marine Corps Air Station in Tustin, Calif., and served in the Persian Gulf with a helicopter squadron on the USS Okinawa. He was serving with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit when he was killed. Capt. Beason is survived by his parents, Lawrence and Madeleine A. Beason of Mineola, Wood County; five sisters, Cheryl Edney of Sachse, Cindy Bertrand of Evanston, Ill., Cathy Reineking of Dallas, Cissy Williams of San Saba, San Saba County, and Mary Beason of Mineola; grandparents Lawrence and Annie Beason of Malvern, Ark.; and eight nephews and nieces.
     
  • Bell, 2Lt. Darren M. - infantry officer from Tampa, FloridaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Castro, Pfc. Saul D. Jr. - Lamont, CaliforniaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Decker, Pfc. Kurt R. - rifleman from Toledo, Ohio
    One of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Depew, LCpl. Michael "Pepe" A. - rifleman from Red Lion, PennsylvaniaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Edwards, LCpl. Jon D. - Born July 10, 1969, he was one of four Marines killed in a CH-46 helicopter crash on March 17, 1989.  The helicopter crashed into a rice paddy near Toksok-Ri, South Korea while taking part in the annual "Team Spirit" exercises.
     
  • Fejeran, HN Jimmie L. - Navy corpsman One of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Hernandez, LCpl. Andrew A. - machine gunner from Arnold, MichiganOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Johnson, LCpl. Ronald A. - machine gunner from Simi Valley, CaliforniaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Kern, SP4 Peter M. - A medivac helicopter carrying soldiers wounded in a clash with North Korean troops crashed shortly after takeoff along the western sector of the DMZ at 2145 hours approximately three miles southwest of Panmunjom. LCpl. Kern was one of the fatalities who died March 16, 1969.
     
  • Kim, Cpl. J.B. (ROK) - A medivac helicopter carrying soldiers wounded in a clash with North Korean troops crashed shortly after takeoff along the western sector of the DMZ at 2145 hours approximately three miles southwest of Panmunjom.  Corporal Kim was one of the fatalities who died March 16, 1969.
     
  • Longstaff, LCpl. Anthony P. - machine gunner from Waldo, WisconsinOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • McCluskey, Cpl. Brian K. - rifleman from Brazil, IndianaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • McCormack, CWO4 Jason - An AH-64 Apache crashed in city of Wonju after hitting a high voltage line on November 23, 2015.  Two soldiers from the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Aviation Regiment, 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division were killed.  Jason was one of the two.
     
  • McDaniel, LCpl. Wilbur S. - rifleman from Carthage, TexasOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • McGreevy, Capt. Michael - pilot from Monmouth, New JerseyOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • McKinney, SSgt. George T. - A medivac helicopter carrying soldiers wounded in a clash with North Korean troops crashed shortly after takeoff along the western sector of the DMZ at 2145 hours approximately three miles southwest of Panmunjom.  SSgt. McKinney was one of the fatalities who died March 16, 1969.
     
  • O'Connor, 1Lt. Christopher M. - Born September 30, 1932, he was one of four Marines killed in a CH-46 helicopter crash on March 17, 1989.  The helicopter crashed into a rice paddy near Toksok-Ri, South Korea while taking part in the annual "Team Spirit" exercises.
     
  • Park, Capt. Benjamin S. Jr. - A medivac helicopter carrying soldiers wounded in a clash with North Korean troops crashed shortly after takeoff along the western sector of the DMZ at 2145 hours approximately three miles southwest of Panmunjom. Captain Park was one of the fatalities who died March 16, 1969.
     
  • Pimple, 1Lt. David M. - pilot from Cochise, ArizonaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Ratcliff, LCpl. Carl B. - machine gunner from Bluefield, West VirginiaOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Rothwell, Maj. James C. - A medivac helicopter carrying soldiers wounded in a clash with North Korean troops crashed shortly after takeoff along the western sector of the DMZ at 2145 hours approximately three miles southwest of Panmunjom. Major Rothwell was one of the fatalities who died March 16, 1969.
     
  • Silha, Cpl. Keith N. - machine gunner from Onalaska, WisconsinOne of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Smith, CWO3 Brandon Smith - An AH-64 Apache crashed in city of Wonju after hitting a high voltage line on November 23, 2015.  Two soldiers from the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Aviation Regiment, 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division were killed.  Brandon was one of the two.
     
  • Stoller, SP4 Edwin L. - A medivac helicopter carrying soldiers wounded in a clash with North Korean troops crashed shortly after takeoff along the western sector of the DMZ at 2145 hours approximately three miles southwest of Panmunjom.  SP4 Stoller was one of the fatalities who died March 16, 1969.
     
  • Taylor, CW2 Robert D. - Robert died in a miidair collision between two AH-1 Cobra helicopters during an NVG training mission on November 13, 1991.
     
  • Zanchi, SP5 Carroll C. - A medivac helicopter carrying soldiers wounded in a clash with North Korean troops crashed shortly after takeoff along the western sector of the DMZ at 2145 hours approximately three miles southwest of Panmunjom.  SP% Zanchi was one of the fatalities who died March 16, 1969.
     
  • Zimmerman, Lt. Roy C. - Roy died in a midair collision between two AH-1 Cobra helicopters during an NVG training mission on November 13, 1991.
     
  • Verdugo, SSgt. Jorge - platoon sergeant from Nogales, Arizona.  One of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Vinet, Cpl. Michael W. - Born January 14, 1967, he was one of four Marines killed in a CH-46 helicopter crash on March 17, 1989.  The helicopter crashed into a rice paddy near Toksok-Ri, South Korea while taking part in the annual "Team Spirit" exercises.
     
  • Wooten, 1Lt. Kevin M. - infantry officer from Bowie, Maryland.  One of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989
     
  • Zinser, Sgt. James D. - machine gunner from Portland, Oregon.  One of 22 Marines killed in CH-52D Sea Stallion helicopter crash, Korea, 1989

In February 2005 a US AH-64D Longbow Apache attack helicopter crashed into a hill near a military base in Paju, north of Seoul.

Post-Korean War Helicopter Crew Fatalities in the US Military (out-of-theater)

  • Chauvin, AD3 Robert A. (Coast Guard) -

    Robert was a member of a crew that was practicing auto rotations from an altitude of 1,500 feet on January 20, 1954.  Upon reaching 500 feet, the Sikorsky HO4S-3G [HH]19G] appeared to go out of control.  Upon partial recovery at 100 feet, the main rotor departed the aircraft, followed by the tail rotor, tail boom and drive assembly.  The helicopter plunged into the water near Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles, Washington.  Four men were killed.
     
  • Day, Lt. John W. (Coast Guard) -

    John was a member of a crew that was practicing auto rotations from an altitude of 1,500 feet on January 20, 1954.  Upon reaching 500 feet, the Sikorsky HO4S-3G [HH]19G] appeared to go out of control.  Upon partial recovery at 100 feet, the main rotor departed the aircraft, followed by the tail rotor, tail boom and drive assembly.  The helicopter plunged into the water near Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles, Washington.  Four men were killed.
     
  • Goodman, AD3 William G. (Coast Guard) -

    William was a member of a crew that was practicing auto rotations from an altitude of 1,500 feet on January 20, 1954.  Upon reaching 500 feet, the Sikorsky HO4S-3G [HH]19G] appeared to go out of control.  Upon partial recovery at 100 feet, the main rotor departed the aircraft, followed by the tail rotor, tail boom and drive assembly.  The helicopter plunged into the water near Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles, Washington.  Four men were killed.
     
  • Littleford, AD3 Dale R. (Coast Guard) -

    Dale was a member of a crew that was practicing auto rotations from an altitude of 1,500 feet on January 20, 1954.  Upon reaching 500 feet, the Sikorsky HO4S-3G [HH]19G] appeared to go out of control.  Upon partial recovery at 100 feet, the main rotor departed the aircraft, followed by the tail rotor, tail boom and drive assembly.  The helicopter plunged into the water near Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles, Washington.  Four men were killed.
     
  • Palombini, AD3 William J. (Coast Guard) -

    William was a member of a crew that was practicing auto rotations from an altitude of 1,500 feet on January 20, 1954.  Upon reaching 500 feet, the Sikorsky HO4S-3G [HH]19G] appeared to go out of control.  Upon partial recovery at 100 feet, the main rotor departed the aircraft, followed by the tail rotor, tail boom and drive assembly.  The helicopter plunged into the water near Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles.  Four men were killed.
 
 
 

Close this window
 

2002-2016 Korean War Educator. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use of material is prohibited.

- Contact Webmaster with questions or comments related to web site layout.
- Contact Lynnita for Korean War questions or similar informational issues.
- Website address: www.koreanwar-educator.org
 

Hit Counter