Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "F"

 
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Fano, William J. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant William J. Fano (MCSN: 0-55881), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 July 1953. With his forward outpost position subjected to constant barrages of enemy mortar and artillery fire throughout a three day period, Second Lieutenant Fano fearlessly moved about his defensive position in the face of the murderous hostile fire to shout words of encouragement to his men and, in an effort to insure adequate protection for his position, ordered an eight-man ambush patrol forward of the combat outpost. When the patrol sustained several casualties from a mine explosion and shouted for help, he quickly organized a rescue party and proceeded to lead the group forward. Mortally wounded when another mine exploded while he was en route to the stricken patrol, Second Lieutenant Fano, by his outstanding leadership, courageous initiative and resourcefulness, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York. Death: KIA: July 14, 1953 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, VA.

Fant, Patrick M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Patrick M. Fant (NSN: 0-492685), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Pilot of an Attack Bomber attached to Attack Squadron Seven Hundred Two(VA-702), and serving with Carrier Air Group One Hundred One aboard U.S.S. Boxer (CV-21) during action against enemy forces near Hyon-ni, Korea, on 18 May 1951. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Fant, in his capacity as a low-level rescue patrol pilot, made persistent and determined runs on enemy troops and thwarted their repeated attempt at reaching a downed and injured pilot. Despite intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire that hit his plane in seven places and the fact that another rescue patrol plane with him was shot down, he coolly and efficiently remained on his low level rescue patrol station with a low fuel supply until the arrival of a relief. His vigilance and courageous devotion to duty with complete disregard for his own personal safety were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 192 (February 2, 1952).

Faretra, Louis C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Louis C. Faretra (MCSN: 1355378), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 July 1953. When his company was subjected to devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire while moving forward to the main line of resistance, Private First Class Faretra fearlessly exposed himself to the murderous hostile fire in order to reconnoiter the terrain and locate a route by which the unit could bypass the endangered area. After finding a safer route, he proceeded toward the main body of the company and, although pinned down by a cross fire of intense enemy machine gun fire, succeeded in moving from under the devastating fire. After contacting the company, he successfully led the unit around the impact area to the main line of resistance. Upon reaching the main lines, he contacted friendly elements for instruction and then guided his company into position. Learning that sections of the company had been separated and had not reached the main lines, he voluntarily carried out three trips through an area heavily interdicted by murderous hostile fire and successfully led the remaining units of the company to friendly lines. Moving into position on the flank of the company in the face of deadly enemy fire, he observed a wounded comrade lying in an extremely exposed area and rushed forward to administer first aid treatment to the casualty before removing him to a safe position. By his aggressiveness, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Faretra served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Concord, New Hampshire. Home Town: Concord, New Hampshire.

Farish, George B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain George B. Farish (MCSN: 0-24864), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 October 1950. Completing three flights over enemy-held territory to spot and rescue wounded Marines who had become separated from their unit by a hostile ambush, Captain Farish fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire as he flew at low altitudes to locate the survivors and, effecting a skillful landing to assist in loading them aboard his aircraft, evacuated them to friendly lines. Landing his helicopter in a rice paddy behind hostile lines on one occasion, he climbed to the top of a nearby hill and aided by a passenger, carried two seriously wounded Marines down to the aircraft, one at a time, and transported them to the rear. By his courageous initiative and unselfish actions, he inspired all who observed him and contributed materially to saving the lives of the two Marines. His indomitable devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tinela, Alabama. Home Town: Camden, Alabama.

Farmer, Chester V. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Chester V. Farmer (MCSN: 0-42687), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked his company's sector and inflicted heavy casualties in the ranks, First Lieutenant Farmer fearlessly risked his life to move across 200 yards of terrain swept by small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire in an attempt to reach a position held by assault elements of his company. Upon arriving at the forward area, he expertly supervised the reorganization of the two platoons and took charge of evacuating the wounded. By his superb leadership and cool courage, he inspired the assault platoons to heroic efforts in overrunning the hostile positions. His daring initiative, bold tactics and indomitable fighting spirit throughout the action served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Long Creek, Oregon. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Farmer, Chester V. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Chester V. Farmer (MCSN: 0-42687), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 October 1950. With his company subjected to close range enemy small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire, First Lieutenant Farmer boldly moved forward to assist in directing the fire fight of leading elements. Reaching the front line positions where he found that heavy casualties had been suffered in the ranks, he unhesitatingly moved among the positions, skillfully reorganized the remaining Marines into a hasty defense, directed the evacuation of casualties and, after assuring himself that his troops were effectively positioned, proceeded through heavy flanking hostile fire to bring forward reinforcements and insure that the defense was adequate to the front and flanks. By his superb leadership, skilled tactics and cool courage in the face of intense enemy fire, First Lieutenant Farmer served as an inspiration to all members of the company and contributed materially to the successful repulse of the attackers. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Long Creek, Oregon. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Farmer, Robert P.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 362 - 27 August 1953

Corporal Robert P. Farmer, US52166884, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 6 July 1953, Company "K" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "250" in the vicinity of Honu-chon, Korea. In the ensuing action, the first two sectors of the hill were quickly overrun. As the attacking force began advancing up the third slope of the hill, they came under a hail of fire from a large enemy machine gun bunker and supporting automatic rifle positions. Without regard for his personal safety, Corporal Farmer, a rifleman, started to rush the enemy position, firing his rifle as he moved forward. Shortly thereafter, he succeeded in climbing upon the roof of the bunker. Corporal Farmer then proceeded to hurl two grenades into the aperture. His accurate placement of grenades completely destroyed the enemy position. As he stood up to fire his rifle on other enemy positions, Corporal Farmer was critically wounded by enemy artillery fire. Corporal Farmer's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Farrell, Robert F.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 6 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert F. Farrell (ASN: RA-11192755), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Kyong-ju, Korea, on 10 September 1950. When his company's hillside position was overrun by a numerically superior enemy, and his platoon's officers and non-commissioned officers were occupied in establishing a new line of defense on an adjacent ridge line, Private Farrell unhesitatingly assumed command of the remaining men to rally them in the defense of their position. Exposing himself to the increasing enemy machine gun fire, he placed his men in effective firing positions, controlled their fire and, by continuously moving among them, inspired them to renewed efforts. The volume and accuracy of his directed fire succeeded in stopping the enemy and caused their retreat to the reverse slope of the hill. His courage, coolness and gallant actions, under intense enemy fire, won the admiration of his men and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Farrell, Vincent Jerome

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 50 - 8 April 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Vincent J. Farrell, RA17183720, Infantry, Company "B", 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  During the night of 25 April 1953, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, a patrol returning from a mission forward of the main line of resistance unknowingly moved into a minefield.  After identifying themselves to a sentry, the patrol members were told to remain where they were to prevent detonating a mine.  Sergeant Farrell learned of the trapped group and rushed through the trenches to a point close to the mine field.  Disregarding his own personal safety, he advanced toward the trapped men.  Courageously moving across the hazardous area, Sergeant Farrell carefully disconnected the trip wires as he crawled along.  Upon reaching the men, he assisted a wounded man to his feet and bravely guided the patrol members back through the lane he had cleared to the safety of the trenches.  Sergeant Farrell then assisted in ...... [KWE Note: Due to damage caused by a fold on the original citation paper, one line of the citation is not legible.] ... responsible for the safe return of the patrol.  Sergeant Farrell's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from North Dakota.

Farris, Clofus O.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 510 - 4 December 1953

Sergeant First Class Clofus O. Farris, ER15455790, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the afternoon and night of 16 July 1953, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, the combat patrol of which Sergeant Farris was a member was advancing forward of the main line of resistance when it was subjected to heavy barrages of enemy mortar and artillery fire. As a result of the concentration, a number of casualties were sustained and Sergeant Farris immediately began to administer medical aid. In the ensuing movement back to friendly lines, he bravely assisted in evacuating the wounded patrol members, despite the heavy enemy fire, until several other men fell unconscious from the intense heat. Realizing the need for help, he volunteered to climb a highly exposed hillside, contact friendly elements and guide them to the disabled platoon. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously ran up the steep slope in a valiant attempt to reach United Nations positions but was mortally wounded by the enemy fire. Sergeant Farris' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Kentucky.

Farris, Ott C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Ott C. Farris (MCSN: 283666), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1950. When the rifle platoon to which he was assigned was suddenly attacked by an enemy patrol shortly after taking defensive positions, Staff Sergeant Farris immediately left the shelter of his foxhole and moved to a position where he could throw grenades at the attackers whose initial charge had been dispersed by rifle and machine gun fire. After securing his position, he repeatedly exposed himself to the continuous hostile fire, hurling grenades and moving about among his men to shout words of instruction and encouragement. With his unit's supply of grenades exhausted, he walked back a distance of approximately twenty-five yards through devastating enemy fire, obtained a box of hand grenades and returned through the heavy fire to distribute them among his men. The enemy patrol was soon destroyed and no casualties were suffered by the platoon. By his outstanding courage, initiative and inspiring actions throughout, Staff Sergeant Farris contributed in large measure to the success of his platoon and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Clinton, Indiana. Home Town: Maben, Alabama.

Faul, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert A. Faul (MCSN: 1160888), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 and 25 July 1953. When both the platoon leader and platoon sergeant became casualties during his platoon's approach march to the front, Private First Class Faul unhesitatingly assumed command and led his men forward through a devastating enemy artillery and mortar barrage which blanketed the area. Although rendered unconscious by concussion, he again assumed command upon being revived and reorganized the platoon which had sustained heavy casualties. Leading his unit forward to the main line of resistance, he placed his men in fighting positions and then proceeded to reconnoiter his flanks. Returning to the platoon, he organized a reinforced fire team and led them in clearing his flanks of snipers and small groups of enemy soldiers. Fearlessly exposing himself to hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire, he moved about the area to ensure constant control of his men, and supervised the evacuation of the wounded while continuously maintaining contact with other units. By his skilled leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Faul served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Maysville, Kentucky. Home Town: Maysville, Kentucky.

Faulker, Bruce W.

Second Lieutenant Bruce W. Faulkner, a member of Battery B. B2nd AAA AW Battalion (SP), 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 14 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyang-ni, Korea. On that dole the platoon commanded by Lieutenant Faulkner was attached to a rifle battalion. During on enemy attack he remained in an exposed position and directed the fire of his weapons against enemy positions and in support of a counterattack. Upon completion of the counterattack, the infantry was moved elsewhere to meet another enemy assault. Lieutenant Faulkner noticed enemy movement and was subjected to enemy small arms fire from the area that the infantry had just vacated. He left half his gun crews to provide covering fire and led the other half into the area as riflemen. His aggressive action was responsible, for the annihilation of 20 enemy, the capture of 10, and the security of the defensive perimeter. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Faulkner reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Florida.

Featherly, Gerald L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Gerald L. Featherly, Jr. (MCSN: 670577), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Truck Driver of Company D, First Motor Transport Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 August 1951. When the convoy in which he was traveling was subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage and the drivers were forced to leave their vehicles and seek cover, Corporal Featherly unhesitatingly left the comparative safety of his position to administer first aid to two seriously wounded comrades. Realizing that the casualties were in urgent need of skilled medical attention, he bravely exposed himself to the heavy fire to carry the wounded Marines to his truck. Although painfully wounded by hostile mortar fire while carrying the second casualty, he continued to the truck with his comrade and, despite intense pain, drove the stricken men through the barrage to the aid station. By his exceptional courage, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of his fellow Marines, Corporal Featherly served to inspire all who observed him and was greatly instrumental in saving the lives of his comrades, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Grand Rapids, Michigan. Home Town: Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Fedorchak, William Jr.

Headquarters 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 190 - 9 May 1952

Sergeant William Fedorchak Jr., RA13297922, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sangmokil, North Korea.  On 7 May 1952, Sergeant Fedorchak was a member of a patrol whose mission was to penetrate the enemy's line of resistance and to capture prisoners.  Nearing the enemy positions, a movement of the enemy was noticed on a small hill approximately 50 yards to the front of the patrol's position.  Sergeant Fedorchak and five other members of the patrol stealthily crept forward to the enemy position.  On nearing the crest of the hill, the patrol's movement was discovered and an enemy soldier opened fire.  This enemy was immediately joined by approximately fifteen other communist soldiers who were concealed in a shallow trench.  Despite the withering enemy fire and grenades, Sergeant Fedorchak returned the fire with such accuracy that the enemy was forced to take cover.  When a firm base of fire was established it was noticed that one of the patrol members was missing.  Without hesitation, Sergeant Fedorchak and the other members of the patrol proceeded up the slope of the hill to render assistance to their trapped and wounded comrade.  During the increased fire-fight that ensued, the patrol leader, Sergeant Fedorchak, and three other members of the patrol were wounded.  Despite his wounds, he continued to render accurate fire, pinning the enemy down, to permit the safe evacuation of the wounded.  Despite the agonizing pain of his own wound, Sergeant Fedorchak rushed to the aid of one of his wounded comrades, lifted him to his shoulders and with complete disregard for his own safety, he carried the wounded soldier over 200 yards to the comparative safety of the patrol's base.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Fedorchak reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Pennsylvania.

Fees, Fred J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Fred J. Fees, Jr. (MCSN: 0-39447), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Air Controller of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. When his position was subjected to an intense volume of enemy small arms and machine gun fire while he was engaged in directing an air strike on a hill northwest of Hoengsong, Korea, First Lieutenant Fees repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy fire to direct the aircraft against the enemy position holding up the advance of the battalion. Although he received a severe and painful head wound while engaged in this action, he steadfastly refused to be evacuated and continued to carry on the mission by use of hand signals to one of his men until the target was neutralized. By his outstanding courage and leadership, First Lieutenant Fees served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the battalion in securing the objective. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Carrolltown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Carrolltown, Pennsylvania.

Fegan, Joseph G. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Captain Joseph C. Fegan, Jr. (MCSN: 0-13485), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Company Commander, Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 8 August 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea. On 8 August 1950, Captain Fegan was assigned the mission of seizing a well organized enemy position, strongly manned with automatic weapons. Without regard for his own safety, Captain Fegan led the advance and continually exposed himself to enemy fire to coordinate and direct the assault. He crossed open terrain, swept by heavy fire, on three occasions to evacuate wounded Marines. Despite the fact that he lost consciousness three times from heat prostration, he refused to be evacuated, but chose to remain with his command until the position was taken and the enemy overrun. Captain Fegan's gallantry displayed on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Home Town: Washington, D.C.  Death: January 2, 1991.

Feinberg, Irwin

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 159 - 5 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) Irwin Feinberg (ASN: 0-1182568), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery G, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yongdong, Korea, on 24 July 1950. During the enemy advance south of the town his howitzer platoon was subjected to heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire. Throughout the day he moved among his troops without regard to personal safety directing their fire. When the enemy launched a strong tank-led attack, other units were forced to withdraw. Lieutenant Feinberg continued to personally direct his platoon's fire although his position was in immediate danger of being overrun and subjected to the most intense shelling. The men, inspired by his gallant example, poured such a volume of accurate fire into the enemy that the advance was halted with heavy losses in personnel and seven tanks were destroyed. Lieutenant Feinberg's calmness under intense fire and gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Felicia, Francis G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Francis G. Felicia (NSN: 7309533), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 9 August 1952. With the platoon pinned down by intense mortar and automatic weapons fire delivered by the enemy at extremely close range, Hospitalman Felicia bravely moved from one position to another to administer first aid and to assist in the evacuation of the wounded. Although painfully wounded by a shell fragment as he moved forward under a barrage of enemy hand grenades, he succeeded in removing a wounded Marine to safety and in rendering aid to the stricken man, remaining at his post for approximately five hours and administering medical treatment to an estimated fifty casualties. By his courageous initiative, marked fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Hospitalman Felicia served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


6 Jan 1952 - During ceremonies at the 3Rd Bn Cp, Col Julian Lindsay, Co, 65Th Inf Regt, ERD US Inf Div, Presents the Silver Star Medal to Sgt Feliciano (Penuales, P.R.) Of "I" Co. - Us Army Photo By Cpl Fred Krachtus(Ya) 3Rd Sig Co.
(Click picture for a larger view)

Feliciano, Heriberto

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 550 - 5 December 1951

Master Sergeant Heriberto Feliciano, NG10405827, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 30 September 1951, Company "I" had the objective of seizing and securing an enemy-held hill near Chorwon, Korea, which was studded with a series of wooden bunkers and inter- laced with trenches. Sergeant Feliciano and other scouts, crawling uphill under enemy observation and fire to attack the positions with grenades, knocked out the first bunker. Although wounded several times, Sergeant Feliciano continued to advance through the enemy trenches and aggressively attacked and destroyed other hostile pillboxes until friendly forces had advanced and secured the objective. The exemplary determination, objective disregard for personal safety, and superb gallantry displayed by Sergeant Feliciano reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Fenstemacher, Edgar W.

Captain Edgar R. Fenstemacher, O59780, Infantry, US Army, a member of Regimental Headquarters, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action 16-17 July 1950, near the Kum River, Korea. During the withdrawal of the Regiment to new positions, the vehicular convoy was stopped by an enemy roadblock. The Regimental Commander, in attempting to organize a dash through the block, was wounded. Captain Fenstemacher, completely disregarding the heavy rifle and automatic weapons fire that was falling on the narrow road, secured a jeep, turned it around, and took the Regimental Commander to the aid station. Returning to the roadblock, he attempted to organize the men so that it could be reduced. In his fearless actions at this time, Captain Fenstemacher was wounded by a machine gun bullet which hit him in the back of the neck. Finding that he could not break out, Captain Fenstemacher organized a defensive position and gave orders that it would be held until nightfall when the vehicles would be abandoned and personnel would move out on foot, cross-country. Upon the approach of darkness, Captain Fenstemacher organized the remaining personnel, making sure that security patrols were dispatched, that the wounded were carried or assisted, and that all personnel were accounted for. He assumed the lead of the entire group and succeeded in extricating this body of troops from almost certain annihilation. By his courage and skillful leadership, Captain Fenstemacher kept the morale of all at a high pitch. His devotion to duty was of the highest and his actions brought great credit to himself and to the military service. (Captain Fenstemacher was wounded again 20 Sep 1950. NARA fails to list him as WIA on 16 Jul 1950.) GO 57, 24 Jul 1950.Home of record: Lenawee, MI.

Fenton, Ralph Emerson (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Ralph Emerson Fenton (MCSN: 661291), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 June 1951. When his sector was subjected to the brunt of a strong enemy counterattack, Sergeant Fenton boldly moved form one position to another and, in the face of close-range enemy fire, shouted words of encouragement to his men while directing counterfire on the attackers. Constantly in the thick of the fighting, he continued to direct destructive fire on the hostile force until he fell mortally wounded by the enemy. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Fenton served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Springfield, Ohio. Home Town: Springfield, Ohio.

Fenwick, Elmer A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Elmer A. Fenwick, Jr. (MCSN: 1153772), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Although wounded twice during assaults on hostile bunkers while participating in a company attack against strong enemy forces entrenched on a steep hilltop position, Private First Class Fenwick refused evacuation and remained with leading elements which were exposed to intense hostile fire at all times during the attack. Blown off his feet and dazed by a satchel charge thrown from an enemy bunker during the company's final assault on the hostile position, he struggled to his feet and, delivering withering fire on the bunker, succeeded in killing the occupants. By his valiant fighting spirit, fortitude and outstanding courage, Private First Class Fenwick served to inspire all who observed him and aided materially in the success achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Nickerson, Kansas. Home Town: Inman, Kansas.

Ferns, Donald J

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 14 - 8 January 8 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Donald J. Ferns, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as Pilot of a B-26 attack bomber during a daylight armed reconnaissance mission on 6 July 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Ferns attacked an enemy tank and Infantry concentration of approximately division strength in the vicinity of Pyongtack, Korea. On the approach to the heavily defended target, his aircraft was hit by intense anti-aircraft fire and the right engine was in flames. Although in position to break off the approach, Lieutenant Ferns elected to press the attack. He continued the attack until all his ammunition was expended and the target area was in complete disorder and ruin. Only then did he look to his own safety and that of his crew. With one engine feathered, he climbed to an altitude of 800 feet and bailed out his crew; at 600 feet, he parachuted to safety. All landed in enemy territory, but through Lieutenant Fern's leadership successfully evaded enemy forces and returned to United Nations lines. Lieutenant Fern's gallant performance and outstanding devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Ferrell, Joseph E.

Master Sergeant Joseph E. Ferrell, Battery A, 3rd AAA AW Bn. (SP), 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army. On 15 February 1951, near Panganga-ri, Korea, Sergeant Ferrell, while returning from a supporting fire mission with the 2d Battalion, 15th Infantry, come upon another platoon of infantry and a forward observer team pinned down from devastating enemy small arms and mortar fire. Running from vehicle to vehicle, heedless of the enemy fire, he directed his platoon of halftracks to bring accurate fire on the enemy. Using his knowledge of the enemy situation he personally directed tanks into position upon their arrival and under his direction caused the tanks to bring fire to bear on the enemy. During the firing Sergeant Ferrell went to the pinned-down area numerous times and physically carried out eight wounded infantrymen to safe positions where they could receive first aid and be evacuated. Due to his superb leadership and aggressiveness the enemy fire was neutralized and the pinned-down platoon and observer team were able to leave in comparative safety. Sergeant Ferrell's gallant and heroic actions reflect great credit upon himself.  Entered the service from Pennsylvania.

Ferrell, William T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William T. Ferrell (MCSN: 668096), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Fire Team in Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pusong-ni, Korea, on 7 December 1950. Shortly after his squad leader was seriously wounded while leading an attack over open terrain in the face of hostile mortar, machine-gun and small arms fire, Private First Class Ferrell voluntarily assumed command of the squad, reorganized its members and continued the mission of assaulting a well-entrenched and camouflaged enemy position, containing two machine guns and supporting riflemen, Skillfully leading the attack, he was primarily responsible for the success of his squad in seizing the objective, putting the hostile emplacement out of action and securing the position. His initiative, courageous leadership and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in assisting the company in attaining its objectives, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wake County, North Carolina. Home Town: Angler, North Carolina.

Ferrigno, William G.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Master Sergeant William G. Ferrigno (MCSN: 211684), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea. On 29 November 1950, the enemy attacked in battalion strength with one company in the assault against the positions occupied by two rifle platoons. Portions of one platoon's positions were overrun. The hail of enemy fire was terrific. Sergeant Ferrigno, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, continuously moved up and down the platoon front to exhort his fellow Marines to even greater efforts. He pointed out targets to the fire teams, directed their fire and by his own heroic efforts contributed materially to the success of his company in throwing back a numerically superior enemy attacking force. The gallantry displayed on this occasion by Sergeant Ferrigno reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 73 (April 13, 1951). Entered Service From North Carolina.

Ferris, Donald J.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 603 - 24 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Donald J. Ferris, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Flight Leader on a mission over Korea on 17 June 1951. On that date, Captain Ferris attacked a vital rail-bridge north of Sariwon, Korea. In the face of intense anti-aircraft fire, Captain Ferris received two direct hits on his aircraft; one in the tail section and one in the cockpit. He was wounded in the arm and neck and his instruments were destroyed. Despite the injuries to himself and the damage to his aircraft, he continued the attack, making repeated strafing passes at the anti-aircraft gun positions in the area. He broke off his attacks only when forced to by shock, loss of blood, and smoke in the cockpit. Captain Ferris delegated command to his element leader and followed him to home base for a successful landing. As a result of this highly effective mission, important rail installations were destroyed and several gun emplacements knocked out. Captain Ferris' personal courage, flying skill and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Fichter, John A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant John A. Fichter (MCSN: 355501), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. After a valiant attempt to assault strong, well-camouflaged positions occupied by a numerically superior hostile force, Staff Sergeant Fichter skillfully withdrew his fire team to await supporting tank action. When the tanks arrived, he courageously assumed an exposed position in order to lead them forward and, using tank-infantry telephone communications, directed effective fire on the enemy positions. By his daring initiative and aggressive determination, Staff Sergeant Fichter contributed materially to the successful advance of his company and, by his staunch devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Field, Charles H. Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 446 - 21 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles H. Field, Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 30 April 1951 as pilot of a highly vulnerable helicopter on a mission to rescue a South African Air Force flyer who had bailed out near Sinmak, Korea. Arriving in the area Lieutenant Field located the pilot who was flashing a signal mirror near a hilltop. When he discovered the man was wounded he let down immediately to prevent his capture by encircling enemy troops. As the helicopter landed, enemy forces who had remained concealed from the fighter cover, opened up with intense small arms fire. Although his aircraft was hit in the engine section, Lieutenant Field remained at the radio and directed fighters to neutralize enemy positions and to strafe enemy soldiers rushing his aircraft as the wounded pilot was assisted aboard. The enemy continued firing at the helicopter as Lieutenant Field took off and until he was several miles from the pick-up point. Although the aircraft was trailing smoke from a severed oil line and engine failure was threatened, Lieutenant Field flew safely back to friendly territory. Lieutenant Field's gallantry in risking his life to save another was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Field, Hal W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Hal W. Field, Jr. (MCSN: 0-52033), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Observer of Battery G, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 June 1952. When the infantry unit he was voluntarily accompanying on a night raid was brought under heavy enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire which disrupted communications and inflicted many casualties, Second Lieutenant Field, although painfully wounded, exposed himself to intense hostile grenade barrages to reorganize and encourage the men and direct their fire against the enemy. After ensuring the evacuation of all casualties, he bravely directed the rear guard as it fought its way out of the encirclement and, upon reaching a friendly outpost, refused medical aid to adjust artillery fire upon the hostile position. Through his skill in directing the close artillery support, the remainder of the unit was able to disengage and return to friendly lines. By his exceptional courage, professional competence and unyielding devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Field served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newman, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia.

Fields, Buddy R.

Corporal Buddy R. Fields, RA13282328, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy on 20 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. Corporal Fields was on the second floor of a building in the city of Taejon covering the two roads that led into the city with his M-1 rifle. As the attack progressed, an enemy tank entered the city ans was knocked out by friendly fire. The crew of the enemy tank tried to escape but due to Corporal Fields courage and accurate rifle fire he killed five of the enemy tank crew. with disregard for his own personal safety Corporal Fields stayed in his position until enemy fired had shot the first floor beneath him, at which time he rejoined the remainder of his platoon. The act of gallantry displayed by Corporal Fields reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 88, 13 August 1950. He entered the service from Danto, VA.

Fields, Curtis (posthumous)

Citation not yet found.

"Pfc. Curtis Fields, Marshall, Texas, of the 24th Infantry Regiment was fatally wounded as he exposed himself to withering enemy fire to permit his squad to mount their vehicles after volunteering to serve as contact for his company.  He received the Silver Star medal posthumously." - Morning Avalanche, September 12, 1950, Lubbock, Texas)

Fierro, Vito J.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 562 - 30 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Vito J. Fierro, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 27 October 1951 as a B-29 Aircraft Commander, 30th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group (Medium, FIFTH Air Force. On that date, Captain Fierro flew deputy lead in an element of eight aircraft in a daylight formation raid on the vital railway bridge at Sinanju, North Korea. The aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire, resulting in the loss of rudder and all controls. Aggressive attacks by at least 20 enemy fighters rendered all turret systems inoperative, started a serious fire in one engine and severely wounded seven crew members. The extent of these injuries made a bail out attempt impractical. At this time, Captain Fierro flew his damaged aircraft away from the main formation to prevent a possible air collision, even though he fully realized this would make him more vulnerable to attack. His skillful maneuvering of the aircraft to stay under the formation as much as possible afforded his crew the best possible protection. Captain Fierro headed for Kimpo Air Field where medical aid would be available to the wounded. The landing was made without brakes or flaps and with the engine still burning. By his gallantry Captain Fierro, at the risk of his life, distinguished himself in action against the enemy. His composure and superior judgment in a situation of great danger reflect the highest credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Figg, Dennard Merrill (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Dennard Merrill Figg (MCSN: 654162), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rocket Launcher Team Leader in Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. When his convoy was ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force employing small arms, machine guns, mortars, hand grenades and rockets, Corporal Figg exposed himself to the hostile fire to employ his rocket launcher which failed to fire due to faulty ammunition. Meanwhile, enemy rocket fire exploded several vehicles which brightly illuminated the entire convoy. Despite the extremely heavy hostile fire, he crossed the illuminated area to obtain ammunition from a forward vehicle and, as he stood to remove the ammunition from the vehicle, was mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire all who observed him to heroic efforts toward repulsing the enemy attack. His outstanding fortitude, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Figg and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Sibewa Township, Michigan. Home Town: Ann Arbor, Michigan. Death: KIA: December 7, 1950.

Figueroa, Cpl. Felix

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 202 - 19 June 1951

Corporal Felix Figueroa, RA10400643, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 March 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea, Company "I" was advancing on enemy positions located in the general area of Hill 221. Many of these emplacements were strongly entrenched and carefully camouflaged enabling the enemy to place severe fire on the assault troops. As he was moving with the company up the hill, Corporal Figueroa spotted an enemy position which was a primary obstacle in the way of the company's mission. Without hesitation he rushed forward across the hazardous terrain with his automatic rifleman to within five yards of the emplacement. There covered by the fire of the automatic rifle, he threw grenades at his foe until his comrade was wounded by returning fire from the enemy. After assisting the injured soldier to a place of safety, Corporal Figueroa returned to the scene of action and by effective use of hand grenades succeeded in neutralizing the enemy position. His actions witnessed by the whole company, inspired them to make a final assault and capture their objective. The gallantry and outstanding leadership displayed by Corporal Figueroa reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Figueroa, Felix Perez

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 293 - 18 July 1951

Private First Class Felix P. Figueroa, US51062529, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 22 April 1951, while Company "E" was attacking enemy-held positions in the vicinity of Chungsa-ri, Korea, an automatic rifleman who was accompanying the forward elements was seriously wounded by hostile small arms fire. Private Figueroa voluntarily went to his stricken comrade's assistance and successfully evacuated him to a covered position. He then returned and put the abandoned automatic rifle back into operation, thereby maintaining effective fire support for the assaulting unit. Private Figueroa's selfless gallantry materially contributed to the ultimate success of the mission and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

File, Fred L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Fred L. File (MCSN: 1138535), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Headquarters Battery, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as Chief of an artillery Forward Observer Team of the First Korean Marine Corps Regiment, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 July 1951. With his unit forced to temporarily withdraw when subjected to a savage counterattack from enemy forces occupying heavily fortified positions, Private First Class File immediately moved to a rear position with his team and, noticing that the field telephone used to contact supporting artillery had been left behind, rushed forward in the face of intense hostile fire to within 100 yards of the advancing enemy, retrieving the instrument and returning safe to the new position. By his courageous efforts, he enabled the unit to re-establish communications with the artillery and contributed materially to the success of the subsequent counterattack by the regiment which completely routed the hostile forces. His daring initiative, outstanding bravery and zealous devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class File and the United States Naval Service. Born: Elmwood, Illinois. Home Town: Petersburg, Alaska.

Filomeno, Alex G. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Alex G. Filomeno (MCSN: 1152099), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. When his unit encountered intense hostile automatic weapons fire during its attack against a heavily fortified position, Private First Class Filomeno boldly moved to an exposed vantage point and killed the enemy gunner, thereby permitting the platoon to continue its advance. Rejoining his squad, he continued his sniping tactics and, repeatedly charging forward, fired at point targets with exceptional accuracy. After the objective had been secured, Private First Class Filomeno remained steadfast to place effective fire on the fleeing enemy and, although the area was subjected to an intense hostile mortar barrage, continued to deliver devastating counterfire. During a second enemy barrage, he was struck by hostile fire and fell mortally wounded. His skilled marksmanship, personal courage and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in the success of his platoon and reflect great credit upon Private First Class Filomeno and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Marysville, California.  Home Town: Oakland, California. Death: KIA: September 17, 1951.

Finch, Francis E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Francis E. Finch (MCSN: 0-40423), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Battery M, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, FIRSTFMFR 28 May 1953. While his howitzer battery was delivering devastating fire against enemy troops in support of infantry operations, the position was subjected to intense hostile counterbattery fire. When an enemy shill hit one of his gun positions and started a powder blaze, Captain Finch rushed through the murderous hostile barrage to the scene of the fire. After ordering the men of the section to safety, he seized a fire extinguisher and attempted to quell the flames. With the aid of another Marine, he fought the blaze until the flames were extinguished and then assisted in the evacuation of the wounded. By his quick and heroic actions, Captain Finch saved many lives and material and permitted the battery to continue its intensive fire upon the enemy. His outstanding leadership, indomitable courage and gallant efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Elizabeth, New Jersey. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Finn, Edmund L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Edmund L. Finn (MCSN: 1218846), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Scout Observer of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 October 1952. During an intense barrage of enemy artillery, mortar and sniper fire, Sergeant Finn repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy fire in an effort to direct friendly artillery on hostile troops and supporting arms. When the enemy launched a furious night attack on the hill position, he unhesitatingly moved to an open trench to more effectively conduct artillery fire in defense of the outpost. Although painfully wounded by enemy fire, he remained in his position and skillfully instructed a radioman in the technique of calling and directing fire. By his fortitude, courageous initiative and inspiring devotion to duty, Sergeant Finn contributed materially to the successful defense of the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Finnegan, John

Sgt. John Finnegan, U.S. Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 15th AAA AW Battalion, attached to Company C, 31st Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Naedang, Korea.  On November 2, 1951, while attempting to maneuver his halftrack to within close proximity of a combat patrol which was engaged in a firefight with the enemy when a call for litters reached him.  Immediately he secured the litters and made his way on foot through a hail of enemy small-arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire to reach the medical aidmen.  Leaving the litters with the aidmen, he began maneuvering so as to draw the enemy fire from the wounded men's area.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, he continuously exposed himself to the concentrated enemy fire and engaged the hostile forces in a heavy firefight and succeeded in lifting the enemy's fire from the casualties.  The quick thinking and intrepid actions of Sergeant Finnegan enabled the medical aidmen to successfully evacuate 15 men from the dangerously exposed area.  The gallantry displayed reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Finnessey, James F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant James F. Finnessey (MCSN: 1132612), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Platoon Sergeant of Company B, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 August 1952. When his section was assigned the mission of aiding in the relief of a group of Marines who had been ambushed by an enemy force on an outpost position, Staff Sergeant Finnessey drove the hostile soldiers from the forward slope and skillfully maneuvered his tank to within 150 yards of the entrenched enemy on the covered side and reverse slope of the outpost. To ensure maximum fire power, he expertly employed his turret mounted anti-aircraft machine gun and, despite the intense hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire, personally accounted for 9 enemy dead. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and aggressive fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Finnessey served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Mineville, New York. Home Town: Mineville, New York.

Firnstahl, Vernon E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Vernon E. Firnstahl (MCSN: 1102807), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 April 1951. When a devastating hail of grenade and small arms fire from well-entrenched hostile positions seriously depleted the assaulting units and isolated them from the remainder of the platoon during an attack against a strongly fortified enemy hill position, Private First Class Firnstahl, realizing that his leader had become separated from the squad, bravely rushed through the heavy fire from one man to another and directed effective counterfire upon the hostile strong points, enabling the squad to regain fire superiority before moving to an advantageous position to effect reorganization. Upon receiving the order to resume the attack, Private First Class Firnstahl was among the first to overrun the enemy stronghold during a fierce assault which completely routed the hostile fire. His exceptional courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit were major factors in the ultimate success of the attack and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota.

Fischer, Harold E.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 223 - 7 May 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Harold E. Fischer (AFSN: AO-2204126), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as a Pilot, 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, Fifth Air Force, on 24 January 1953. On that date, Captain Fischer was flying number three position in a flight of four F-86 aircraft acting as escort for fighter-bombers on an attack against the Sinanju bridge complex. When enemy MiGs were encountered the flight attacked, during which Captain Fischer's aircraft was damaged by the misfire of one of his fifty caliber guns. Although the rudder cable was completely severed, the cabin pressurization lost, and the flaps unevenly extended, Captain Fischer aggressively pressed his attack on a MiG, flying through molten metal streaming from the burning MiG. Captain Fischer broke off his attack only after successfully destroying the enemy aircraft and disrupting a possible attack on the friendly fighter bombers. Through his high personal courage in attacking, despite the heavy damage to his aircraft, Captain Fischer demonstrated devotion to duty beyond the normal call, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

General Orders: Headquarters, Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 223 (May 7, 1953)

 

Fischer, Herbert G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Herbert G. Fischer (MCSN: 0-54491), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 August 1952. While leading his men in an assault against a strongly fortified enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Fischer courageously exposed himself to intense hostile small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire to deploy his men more effectively and to ensure the evacuation of the wounded. Upon reaching the objective, he reorganized his platoon, established a firm defensive position and prepared to repel an enemy counterattack. By his skillful planning, he contributed materially to the repulse of the counterattack. His exceptional courage, coolness under fire and inspiring devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Fischer and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Fischer, Jack Stewart (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Jack Stewart Fischer (MCSN: 1103632), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Automatic Rifleman in a Rifle Platoon of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1950. During a night attack by a numerically superior force of hostile troops which simultaneously penetrated the forward echelon and attempted to surround the rear guard of his platoon, Private Fischer voluntarily remained at his post to cover the withdrawal of his unit to more tenable ground and the evacuation of numerous casualties caused by intense small arms and machine gun fire. Despite the overwhelming odds, he continued to deliver accurate and effective fire until the enemy overran his position. By his courageous initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, he was materially responsible for the successful consolidation of his platoon's position in a more favorable location and for the evacuation of all the wounded personnel. His coolness in the face of great personal risk and outstanding devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: March 19, 1931 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: San Francisco, California.

Fischer, James H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James H. Fischer (MCSN: 1272446), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 February 1953. When the platoon was subjected to intense enemy fire while carrying out a raid against a strongly fortified hostile position, Corporal Fischer exposed himself to the devastating small arms, mortar, artillery and grenade fire to direct his squad in the attack and, although painfully wounded by enemy grenades, continued to lead his men and seized the objective despite heavy casualties. After eliminating all hostile opposition by leading his attached flame thrower team through the entire area, he directed a withdrawal and supervised the expeditious evacuation of his wounded comrades, accepting medical aid for his own severe wounds only after all other casualties had received assistance. By his gallant leadership, indomitable fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Fischer served to inspire all who observed him and contributed greatly to the success of the operation, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Mather, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Rices Landing, Pennsylvania.

Fisher, Franklin L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 574 - 6 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Franklin L. Fisher, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Jet Fighter Pilot, 4th Fighter Interceptor Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 16 October 1951. Leading a formation of four F-86s in a Squadron of sixteen aircraft on combat aerial patrol in the Sinuiju-Yalu River area of North Korea, Major Fisher displayed exceptional valor when his flight was engaged in aerial combat against overwhelming numbers of enemy MIG-15 jet fighters. With outstanding leadership and skill, Major Fisher repeatedly led his formation in vicious attacks against the enemy. Sighting a formation of eight enemy MIG-15s maneuvering to assault a friendly formation of fighter-bombers, Major Fisher deployed his flight and attacked. With coolness and skill he brought his guns to bear on one of the enemy and destroyed him, while the remainder of the enemy flight dispersed and withdrew from the area. Low on fuel and with only three guns remaining in operation, Major Fisher was attacked by another formation of enemy aircraft. With extraordinary airmanship he outmaneuvered the enemy and brought his guns to bear on a second enemy MIG-15, scoring heavy strikes on the fuselage and wings. Shortly thereafter, the enemy pilot ejected himself as his aircraft burst in flame. The tenacity displayed by major Fisher in personally destroying two enemy MIG-15s, and his courage against overwhelming odds, reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Fisher, Myles E. (POW - Later Released)

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 466 - 27 June 1951

Private First Class Myles E. Fisher, RA16262084, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division distinguished himself by courageous action near Chonggo-ri, Korea, during the night of 31 December 1950-January 1, 1951.  The positions of the First Battalion were attacked by a Chinese Communist force estimated to be of Division strength, supported by intense artillery and mortar barrages.  Private Fisher, an automatic rifleman, was covering a portion of the road leading into his platoon area.  As the enemy advanced up this road, trip flares were set off, silhouetting him in Private Fisher's sights.  He killed forty enemy, temporarily halting their advance.  As the enemy resumed his attack, more flares rocketed into the air turning night into day and once again Private Fisher's accurate fire accounted for many enemy killed.  Under cover of prolonged darkness, the enemy threatened to encircle his platoon.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Fisher exposed himself to the intense enemy fire and ran to a nearby haystack, setting it afire.  This action illuminated the entire area, enabling his platoon to hold off the enemy the remainder of the night.  Early the next morning the enemy masses hit again and the order to withdraw was given.  He, again disregarding his own safety, refused to leave his position as long as other friendly units were withdrawing through his position.  When last seen, he was laying behind his weapon firing into the enemy hordes as they stormed in around his lone position.  His action resulted in an estimated 100 enemy killed and allowed his and other friendly units to withdraw successfully.  Private Fisher's courageous actions and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Toledo, Ohio.

Fitzgerald, Richard

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard Fitzgerald (MCSN: 651907), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. When the company was subjected to withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from an enemy roadblock and a friendly tank was ordered to the area to neutralize the roadblock, Private First Class Fitzgerald volunteered to accompany the vehicle to protect it from enemy infantrymen. Courageously moving forward through the hail of enemy fire, he refused to seek cover and remained with the tank until the roadblock was destroyed. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Fitzgerald served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Paterson, New Jersey. Home Town: Paterson, New Jersey.

Fitzgerald, Richard Malcolm (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Richard Malcolm Fitzgerald (MCSN: 1216728), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1953. With the outpost position under attack by an overwhelming force of hostile troops during the hours of darkness, Private Fitzgerald fearlessly engaged the enemy with hand grenades and machine gun fire to repulse the vicious attack. Later, upon learning that two wounded men were lying in an exposed area, he moved forward in the face of an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage to administer aid to the stricken Marines and to remove them to safe positions. Returning to his machine gun, he directed his men to remain in their positions and proceeded to move them to safe positions. Returning to his machine gun, he directed his men to remain in their positions and proceeded to move his weapon to a new firing location. When the enemy launched another fierce assault, he opened fire from his unsuspected position to create the illusion of a stronger defense and aided in repelling the attack, accounting for a heavy toll among the hostile troops. Mortally wounded during the fierce engagement, Private Fitzgerald, by his indomitable fighting spirit, outstanding courage and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, was directly responsible for saving the lives of two of his comrades and contributed in large measure to the defense of the outpost, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Ballston Spa, New York. Home Town: Pitcher, New York. Death: KIA: July 26, 1953.

Fitzpatrick, Thomas H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Thomas H. Fitzpatrick (MCSN: 1327707), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1953. Observing a seriously wounded Marine wandering aimlessly 400 yards in front of the protective barbed wire on the main line of resistance, Private Fitzpatrick unhesitatingly left the comparative safety of the trench line and raced through a hail of hostile mortar and sniper fire to assist the stricken man. Leading his wounded comrade to a covered position, he administered first aid and again exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to cover the retirement of a Corpsman and the wounded Marine back to friendly lines. By his inspiring initiative, cool courage and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Private Fitzpatrick was directly instrumental in saving the life of the critically wounded man and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Fitzwater, Robert R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Robert R. Fitzwater (MCSN: 1090221), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of the First Battalion, 1st Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hill 676 in Korea, on 10 June 1951. On that date, his unit was given the mission of attacking Hill 676, then occupied by a well entrenched enemy force. During the attack, the platoon of which Corporal Fitzwater was a member was subjected to intense enemy fire and forced to seek cover. Realizing that delay in securing the objective would endanger other units participating in the attack, Corporal Fitzwater voluntarily crossed fire-swept terrain, throwing hand grenades into the midst of the enemy. His courageous and daring actions effectively silenced several enemy weapons, and permitted his platoon to continue in the advance and ultimately secure its objective. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Fitzwater on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 175 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Delaware.

Fix, Joseph E. III

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 231 - 6 July 1953

Captain Joseph E. Fix III, 060527, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 22 February 1953, Company "A", under the command of Captain Fix, was holding a vital segment of the main line of resistance in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, when the enemy launched an intense company sized attack against the second platoon sector. Captain Fix, who had been at his company command post, immediately made his way to the point of greatest enemy assault under a devastating hail of hostile mortar and small arms fire. Directing the defensive fire of his men, he quickly realized the situation dictated reinforcements for the friendly platoon which, already under strength, was faced by superior numbers. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he again made his way under intense fire to the rear, returning minutes later with urgently needed reinforcements from among the cooks, drivers, clerks, and other headquarters personnel to bolster the defense. At a critical point in the action, he effectively deployed his men while exposed to constant enemy fire. In the fire fight which ensued, he positioned himself at the foremost point of enemy advance to direct and coordinate the defense. The enemy was defeated and withdrew, suffering heavy casualties. Captain Fix's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Colorado.

Flack, Jack Edward (1st award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Jack Edward Flack (MCSN: 340809), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Machine Gun Squad of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. Courageously manning a machine gun after its operator had been mortally wounded during a vigorous assault against hostile positions on Hill 532, Corporal Flack furnished uninterrupted support to the attacking unit and, although wounded in the face during this action, coolly remained at his post to deliver intense fire on the enemy, thereby permitting the platoon to advance and overcome all hostile resistance. Bold and aggressive throughout this engagement, he submitted to treatment and evacuation only after the objective had been secured. His indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty inspired all those who observed him and aided the platoon in accomplishing its mission, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Herrington, Kansas. Home Town: Falfurrias, Texas. Death: KIA: March 8, 1951.

Flack, Jack Edward (2nd award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Sergeant Jack Edward Flack (MCSN: 340809), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Light Machine Gun Squad of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 March 1951. During the company's attack against heavily fortified gun emplacements north of Hoengsong, Sergeant Flack repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to keep pace with the assaulting echelons and to set up his guns in positions calculated to give the assault forces maximum support. When the squad position became untenable after he was critically wounded by a burst of enemy automatic weapons fire, he coolly directed the displacement of the gun to a covered position where it could continue to support the attack before he submitted to treatment for his wounds which proved to be fatal. By his outstanding leadership, courageous fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty, Sergeant Flack upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Herrington, Kansas. Home Town: Falfurrias, Texas. Death: KIA: March 8, 1951.

Flagg, Donald Edward (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Donald Edward Flagg (MCSN: 1301181), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 November 1952. When his squad established contact with the enemy, Private First Class Flagg courageously exposed himself to intense enemy mortar, machine gun, grenade and small arms fire. As he advanced on an enemy trench, he threw grenades, fired his rifle and skillfully directed the fire of the automatic rifleman. After fire superiority had been obtained, he again exposed himself to intense hostile fire to remove and bring back to the perimeter a wounded member of the squad. Mortally wounded himself while assisting in the evacuation of casualties to the main lines, Private First Class Flagg, by his indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Putnam, Connecticut. Home Town: Putnam, Connecticut. Death: KIA: November 20, 1952.

Flaherty, Joseph L.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders #331 - 17 June 1953

Second Lieutenant Joseph L. Flaherty, 01883444, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sokkogae, Korea.  On 18 April 1953, Lieutenant Flaherty, a platoon leader, was placing his men in attack position under a constant rain of enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire.  Moving up the rocky slope, Lieutenant Flaherty's platoon received withering automatic-weapons and small-arms fire from the enemy and the men began to falter.  Realizing the gravity of the situation, Lieutenant Flaherty charged forward, firing his weapon and throwing hand grenades with deadly accuracy.  Although wounded by mortar fire, Lieutenant Flaherty refused to be evacuated and continued to rally his platoon in the attack.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Flaherty reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Massachusetts.

Flake, Leon E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Leon E. Flake (ASN: RA-18335877), United States Army, for gallantry in action on 2 September 1950, at Pohang, South Korea, while serving in Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Flake distinguished himself during an attack against enemy positions on Hill 99. After suffering heavy losses, Corporal Flake's platoon was pinned down in a dry river gulch by a hail of enemy machine gun fire emanating from Hill 99. Corporal Flake, with no thought of his own personal safety, rushed the enemy position, sustaining serious wounds in both legs from enemy fire. Corporal Flake's gallant action allowed three of his fellow comrades to gain further ground up Hill 99. The gallantry in action displayed by Corporal Flake on this occasion reflects the highest tradition of military service, and reflects great credit on himself, the 21st Infantry Regiment, and the United States Army.

Fleischner, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert A. Fleischner (MCSN: 0-54493), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 - 26 July 1953. Although painfully wounded, First Lieutenant Fleischner organized and led the remainder of his platoon throughout the night in a desperate defense of a critical sector of the main line of resistance against a numerically superior attacking force. Refusing evacuation or medical aid, he led counterattacks against groups of heavily armed enemy troops and repeatedly engaged in bitter hand-to-hand fighting in a determined effort to clear the trench lines and defend his wounded comrades. At dawn, he organized a group of Marines armed with a rocket launcher, rifles and hand grenades and skillfully maneuvered his men through the forward trench lines, clearing snipers and infiltrators from damaged bunkers and other installations. By his courageous leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Fleischner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Haven, Connecticut. Home Town: New Haven, Connecticut.

Fleming, 1st Lt. Charles H. (1st citation)

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders #21 - January 1950

First Lieutenant Charles H. Fleming, 0971789, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 6 December 1950 at Majon-dong, Korea, Lieutenant Fleming distinguished himself in action against an armed enemy. His platoon was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force during the early morning hours. Lieutenant Fleming, realizing the seriousness of the situation when his platoon's position was penetrated, went to the assistance of a squad that had been cut off. During the action he helped evacuate two wounded men; to reach the position required going through small arms fire. After he had returned to his original position he fired a rocket launcher into the attacking enemy causing great havoc. During this action Lieutenant Fleming's carbine jammed, he then grabbed a rifle which had been discarded and fired it until he ran out of ammunition, then used his pistol, and then picked up and used the rocket launcher. As a result of these actions by Lieutenant Fleming the enemy were driven off and the area  restored. The extraordinary versatility, courage, and heroism displayed by Lieutenant Fleming reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Connecticut.

Fleming, 1st Lt. Charles H. (2nd citation) (KIA)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 - 5 July 1951

First Lieutenant Charles H. Fleming, 0971789, Infantry, Company "K", 65th  Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 January 1951, near  Songhongdong, Korea, Lieutenant Fleming was leading his platoon in the attack on a ridge line near Hill 582. As the unit reached the base of the objective, it was suddenly fired on from the front and both flanks. Lieutenant Fleming, moving calmly and encouragingly among his men, ordered and led a savage bayonet assault against the primary objective, causing the enemy soldiers to flee their positions. Upon securing the objective, hostile automatic weapons fire was received from a small hill to the front. When two of Lieutenant Fleming's Sergeants attempted to observe and locate the enemy weapons, he ordered them to take cover and promptly took an exposed position, deliberately drawing the enemy fire and observing with his binoculars. Locating one hostile weapon, he pointed it out to his machine gunner and was attempting to locate more when mortally wounded. Lieutenant Fleming's selfless gallantry and outstanding  leadership instilled the highest admiration in the hearts of his men and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Connecticut.

Flesch, Joseph M.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 379 - 4 September 1953

Lieutenant Colonel Joseph M. Flesch, 031800, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the afternoon of 14 July 1953, in the vicinity of Kundong-Myon, Korea, liaison between Colonel Flesch's unit and an adjacent friendly unit had not been re-established following intense enemy action. Serving as Regimental Executive Officer, he was aware of the dangerous consequences which could result, and elected to personally make the contact. Accompanied by a lieutenant, he left friendly lines, and proceeded into disputed terrain in search of the friendly force, in one instance coming within one hundred yards of an enemy position. They proceeded approximately fifteen hundred yards through the area under constant enemy observation and harassing mortar and automatic weapons fire, before reaching elements of a Republic of Korea division. After quickly and decisively working out tactical problems necessary in consolidating the line with the commander of the organization, the returned to their unit, accompanied by a Republic of Korea liaison officer, again crossing the hazardous terrain. Colonel Flesch immediately made his report on the intelligence he had obtained from his mission and made recommendations for readjustments which resulted in an effective tactical deployment of the regiment. Colonel Flesch's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Missouri.

Flood, George G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant George G. Flood (MCSN: 0-50214), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 March 1951. When the company was pinned down by a devastating hail of enemy fire while he was leading his platoon up a steep and narrow approach to a high, heavily fortified ridge defended by a strong enemy fore, Second Lieutenant Flood moved forward of the lines to reconnoiter and, placing his attached machine guns to give maximum supporting fire, led his men in a charge against the hostile positions. Although the enemy delivered withering machine gun and grenade fire as the unit neared the emplacements, forcing the men to take cover, Second Lieutenant Flood valiantly charged the enemy bunkers alone, hurling a volley of hand grenades which temporarily silenced the hostile fire and enabled his platoon to renew the assault and to overrun the positions. By his exceptional. Courage, leadership and aggressive fighting spirit in the face of great odds, Second Lieutenant Flood served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Seattle, Washington. Home Town: Seattle, Washington.

Flora, Charles Kenneth (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Charles Kenneth Flora (MCSN: 1215996), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 July 1952. During the temporary withdrawal of his platoon to fresh positions after being subjected to intense hostile mortar, machine gun and small arms fire while engaged in the assault of a heavily defended enemy position, Private First Class Flora voluntarily remained at his post to provide cover for the platoon. Undeterred by a virtual hail of hostile fire, he brought his rifle to bear on the enemy positions and succeeded in sufficiently neutralizing the opposition to allow his platoon to withdraw and establish a new base of fire. Mortally wounded while courageously staving off the enemy counterattack, Private First Class Flora, by his valiant stand in the face of heavy odds, served to inspire all who observed him. His outstanding bravery, determined fighting spirit and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of his comrades were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 24, 1933 at Williamsport, Maryland. Home Town: Williamsport, Maryland.

Flores, Mike

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Mike Flores (MCSN: 1055120), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company D, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Saemal, Korea, on 7 June 1951. On that date, Sergeant Flores, while attached to a combat patrol, repeatedly exposed himself to severe enemy fire in order to direct effective rocket fire on numerous well-fortified enemy emplacements. When his supply of ammunition became depleted, Sergeant Flores organized the personnel of his section as riflemen. As a result of this action, the patrol was able to repel an enemy ambush. Subsequently he made three trips, over fire-swept terrain, without regard for his personal safety, to effect the rescue of wounded Marines and return them to a position of relative safety. His courageous actions contributed materially to the routing of the enemy and the successful accomplishment of the unit's mission. The gallantry, initiative and high devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Flores on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 177 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From California.

Flowers, Earl D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Earl D. Flowers (MCSN: 655580), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 December 1950. Skillfully leading his men up a steep, snow-covered slope in the face of intense hostile fire during the attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Corporal Flowers moved from one bunker to another, killing the occupants and shouting words of encouragement to his men. When his team's supply of ammunition was exhausted, he occupied a hostile entrenchment and hurled captured hand grenades on additional enemy positions. After receiving a supply of ammunition, he led his men forward again in a vicious assault of the remaining hostile positions and completely routed the enemy. By his indomitable courage, aggressive fighting spirit and inspiring leadership, Corporal Flowers contributed materially to the success of the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Anderson, Indiana. Home Town: Anderson, Indiana.

Flynn, Edward P. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Edward P. Flynn, Jr. (NSN: 0-88749), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during mine sweeping operations in Wonsan in the Korean theater during the period 10 to 31 October 1950. As Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Incredible (AM-24() and while sweeping enemy mine fields in the face of heavy fire from enemy coast defense batteries, by his inspiring leadership and professional competence, he contributed directly to the efficient operations of his ship and the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950).

Foley, Frederick J. Jr.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - 14 February 1961

Captain Frederick J. Foley, Jr., (then SFC), Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on or about 3 December 1950, in North Korea.  As leader of the 3d Platoon, Company G, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, Captain Foley was in command of a unit which, while repelling an enemy attack from the top of a ridge in a defensive position, had sustained heavy casualties.  Noticing that automatic enemy weapons fire had pinned down two members of his squad, and that one of the men was seriously wounded, Captain Foley advanced to the position of the trapped men and silenced the enemy weapons with a hand grenade.  This unselfish and courageous action made it possible to evacuate the wounded man.  Captain Foley's conspicuous heroism in risking his life to save that of his fellow soldier is in the most cherished tradition of the United States Army, and reflects distinct credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Portland, Maine.

Foley, Warren J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Boatswain's Mate Third Class Warren J. Foley (NSN: 2255899), United States Navy, for heroic action and devotion to duty while attached to Underwater Demolition Team Three and serving with Special Operations Group, Amphibious Group One during operations against the enemy at Yosu, Korea, on the night of 4 - 5 August 1950. Acting as an advance scout for a demolition raiding party, Boatswain's Mate Third Class Foley swam ashore unarmed to reconnoiter the objective area about 45 miles behind enemy lines. He was then ordered by the officer in charge to return to the raiding party assembly area to direct it to the objective. While returning to the raiding party assembly area, Boatswain's Mate Third Class Foley saw that the Officer in Charge was trapped by an armed group of the enemy. He immediately obtained a submachine gun and voluntarily attempted to return to protect and assist this officer. In making this attempt, he exposed himself to direct enemy fire and sustained wounds in his hands and leg. His bravery and outstanding devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 7792 (December 30, 1950).

Folmar, Jesse G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Jesse G. Folmar (MCSN: 0-26438), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 September 1952. When the two-plane flight which he was leading to the target area near Chinnampo was suddenly attacked by eight hostile jet interceptors, Captain Folmar immediately initiated effective defensive measures so that he and his wingman could bring fire to bear on the enemy aircraft. Aggressively maneuvering his plane to the inside of one of the attacking hostile jets, he skillfully fired a burst from his guns that ripped into the side of the jet, causing it to burst into flames and forcing the enemy pilot, with his clothing ablaze, to abandon the flaming jet which subsequently crashed into the Taedong estuary. While Captain Folmar was maneuvering his aircraft to ward off another attack, his plane was hit and severely damaged by hostile fire, forcing him to parachute. With the hostile jets continuing to make firing runs, he landed in the water from which he was rescued by friendly forces. By his indomitable courage, outstanding airmanship and gallant devotion to duty, Captain Folmar was directly responsible for the complete destruction of a hostile jet aircraft and contributed materially to the safe return of his wingman, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Montgomery, Alabama.

Fonseca, SFC Candido Colon

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121 - 6 May 1952

Sergeant First Class Candido Colon Fonseca, RA10405562, Infantry, Company "L", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 12 December 1950, Sergeant Colon Fonseca was sent with the second platoon of Company "L", as platoon sergeant, to take the village of Haton-ni Korea, about four miles from the company command post. When Sergeant Colon Fonseca and his platoon crossed the river just in front of the village, they were met with an extremely heavy fire from small arms, machine guns, mortars in the hands of a numerically superior, well entrenched enemy. Receiving an order to withdraw, Sergeant Colon Fonseca, without regard for his own personal safety, took an exposed position and, with two other men, kept delivering fire on the enemy to cover the platoon's withdrawal. After dark he was able to neutralize the enemy machine guns with his rifle and hand grenades. During the battle one of his two companions, a Republic of Korea soldier, was wounded and Sergeant Colon Fonseca, after giving him first aid, carried him more than four miles to safety. Sergeant Colon Fonseca gallantry, personal courage, and disregard for his own safety reflect grant credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Fontana,  Paul John

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Paul John Fontana (MCSN: 0-5344), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Air Group at Kimpo Airfield, Korea, on 21 September 1950. Lieutenant Colonel Fontana, as tactical air coordinator, was assigned the mission of executing close air support against an enemy strongpoint at Yong Dong Po, Korea. With a high degree of courage and skill, he led his strike against fierce enemy anti-aircraft fire, personally making numerous passes at extremely low altitudes. As a result of this daring attack the enemy installations were completely neutralized. Lieutenant Colonel Fontana's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 24 (November 5, 1950). Born: Lucca, Italy. Home Town: Sparks, Nevada.

Foor, Howard Osborn (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Howard Osborn Foor (MCSN: 0-49837), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1950. When the intermittent glare of an exploding ammunition truck, less than ten yards from his platoon's position, revealed a large hostile force massing for a night assault, Second Lieutenant Foor courageously assembled and led his men in a counterattack which resulted in fierce hand-to-hand combat. Skillfully directing and encouraging his unit from a position at the head of the platoon, he was largely responsible for the killing of thirty of the enemy and for the complete rout of the remainder of the hostile troops. By his inspiring leadership, great personal valor and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Second Lieutenant Foor upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Ford, Jett T. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Jett T. Ford, Jr. (MCSN: 0-53246), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 November 1952. When a patrol of his unit was under attack by enemy forces, Second Lieutenant Ford voluntarily led a reinforcing and evacuation group to the besieged men and skillfully directed and supervised the expeditious evacuation of casualties, calling in and adjusting friendly artillery and mortar fire to protect the position. Informed that two Marines were still unaccounted for, he refused to return to the outpost until he had conducted a thorough search for the missing men. During the search, one enemy soldier was killed while attempting to remove one of the dead Marines. After successfully locating both missing casualties, Second Lieutenant Ford held the patrol intact to remove all friendly and enemy equipment and weapons and, only when daylight made his location untenable, returned to the combat outpost. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Ford contributed materially to the success of the patrol and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Baldwin, Mississippi. Home Town: Baldwin, Mississippi.

Forman, Robert D.

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in Air Force Regulation 30-14, 22 August 1950 and Section VII, General Order Number 63, Department of the Air Force, 19 September 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry during the periods indicated is awarded to the following named officers:

Colonel Robert D. Forman, United States Air Force. Colonel Forman distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 6 December 1950. When the fate of a small airstrip was uncertain, Colonel Forman, disregarding his personal safety, flew a C-47 to the strip and landed in the midst of a fierce fight between American troops and the numerically superior enemy. With only a few hours of daylight left, Colonel Forman personally directed the aerial evacuation which successfully removed all battle casualties from the strip. When it became clear that the field was no longer tenable, Colonel Forman dispatched all other C-47s and prepared to leave in his own. At this moment, with darkness fast approaching, Colonel Forman received a message from a radio jeep that there was one more critically wounded United States Marine in desperate need of aerial evacuation. Colonel Forman waited an hour, while the enemy closed in on the field. The battle casualty was finally placed aboard his plane and he made an after dark take-off in the face of strong enemy fire. The leadership, courage, and outstanding heroism displayed by Colonel Forman on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Forty, Juan F. Rodriguez

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 546 - 30 November 1951

Private First class Juan F. Rodriguez Forty, US29129750, Company "C" 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 3 June 1951, Company "C" launched an attack on the enemy, holding Hill 466 near Sunbong-ni, Korea. From the advantageously located enemy positions on sheer rocky cliffs approaching the hill, the hostile troops brought the First Platoon under intense fire, slowing the advance. Private Rodriguez Forty, to facilitate the attack and with complete disregard for his personal safety, climbed the cliffs in the face of hostile fire, pausing only to throw some of the enemy's own hand grenades back at them. Assisted by another enlisted man, he successfully charged and destroyed two enemy machine guns and killed the gunners. Private Rodriguez Forty's gallantry and courage greatly aided the company in seizing its objective and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Fossum, Adoph C.

Headquarters 24th Division
General Orders No. 153 - 2 October 1950

Captain (then First Lieutenant) Adolph C. Fossum, 050317, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, First Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in August 1950.  Serving as S-3 when his battalion was engaged in clearing the enemy from the Naktong River bulge, he distinguished himself by courageous actions.  Preparatory to an attack, he moved under intense enemy machine gun and rifle fire into the company area to issue the operational plan.  During the attack itself, he established an observation post far forward of the leading elements.  Although his post was promptly observed by the enemy and subjected to an intensive artillery and mortar barrage, he remained in his exposed position. With utter disregard for his own safety, he continued to observe and control the area.  In this gallant action Captain Fossum was wounded.  His fearless example, devotion to duty, and deep sense of responsibility reflect great credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered the service from Stillwater, Minnesota.

Foster, Elmer R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Elmer R. Foster (MCSN: 0-37941), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMF-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 June 1952. Initiating his third attack through intense and accurate enemy fire while participating in a close support mission against heavily defended hostile front-line positions, Captain Foster sustained severe wounds when an enemy anti-aircraft projectile struck his plane, shattering the canopy and exploding the cockpit. Courageously pressing home the attack despite his painful wounds, the damage to his plane and the increasing defensive fire, he scored direct bomb and rocket hits on a hostile command post and an automatic weapons position. Although rapidly losing consciousness and suffering intense pain, he skillfully maneuvered his crippled aircraft and succeeded in landing safely on a small emergency crash strip near the front lines. By his outstanding courage, gallant fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Captain Foster contributed greatly to the success of a mission that substantially reduced enemy pressure on friendly troops of the Republic of Korea Army, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Foster, John P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John P. Foster (MCSN: 1151912), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Clerk of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 12 - 13 August 1952. When a friendly unit was pinned down and isolated by devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire while attacking an outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance, Corporal Foster voluntarily organized teams of indigenous personnel to convoy vitally needed supplies to the beleaguered unit. Dauntlessly advancing through the intense hostile fire, he made trips on an average of every twenty minutes throughout the night, delivering sufficient supplies to enable the friendly force to conduct operations for at least twenty-four hours and, on return trips, carried wounded personnel to a point from which they could be safely evacuated. Although seriously wounded and rendered temporarily blind and deaf after several trips under heavy fire, he refused evacuation and resumed his mission of supplying the isolated friendly company, thereby undoubtedly saving the stricken unit from annihilation. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fortitude and heroic actions in the face of enemy fire, Corporal Foster contributed materially to the success achieved by the company in repulsing the hostile force and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wheatland, Missouri. Home Town: Lake Ozark, Missouri.

Fouts, Ralph D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Ralph D. Fouts (MCSN: 1098163), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Runner of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. When the company's 60-mm. mortars ran out of ammunition during a fierce attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Fouts volunteered to return to the company supply dump located near an enemy penetration. Under constant fire, he proceeded with another Marine and made two trips which necessitated his moving well forward of his company's holding position. Returning to the supply dump for a third time, he and his companion obtained a jeep and trailer, loaded it with ammunition and drove it back through the lines to the company command post. By his courageous action he contributed materially to the success of his company in holding off the assault until more ammunition could be obtained from rear areas. Later during the engagement, he voluntarily joined a party being formed to go to the aid of a platoon besieged by hostile fire and, moving into a dangerously exposed position, assisted in warding off the enemy's assaults until he was wounded. By his aggressive determination, gallant fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class Fouts upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Norwich, Ohio. Home Town: New Concord, Ohio.

Frame, Lanty R. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Lanty R. Frame (MCSN: 1317829), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 March 1953. Participating in the defense of an important outpost forward of the main line of resistance as hostile forces launched a barrage of artillery and mortar fire, followed by a savage assault, Private First Class Frame unhesitatingly brought accurate and killing fire to bear on the enemy. When the attackers succeeded in breaking through the perimeter defense and gained the forward portion of the outpost trench, isolating Private First Class Frame and another Marine from the main body, he dauntlessly fought his way through the trench to gain an exposed position from which to deliver more effective fire. Although he was the target for mounting hostile mortar and small arms fire when the enemy attempted to reinforce and exploit their initial gain, he fired his rifle with deadly accuracy for over an hour and hurled grenades to his flanks as small hostile units moved in behind him. Mortally wounded while continuing his brave efforts, Private First Class Frame, by his outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 22, 1931 at Sutton, West Virginia. Home Town: Sutton, West Virginia. Death: KIA: March 26, 1953.

France, Donald Richard (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain Donald Richard France (MCSN: 0-13596), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Intelligence Officer of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 21 September to 6 December 1950. Exhibiting a high degree of professional skill and confidence in the performance of his important duties, Captain France efficiently maintained vital records and reports concerning enemy strength and positions. Continually exposing himself to direct hostile fire in order to gain accurate and factual information, he was mortally wounded while engaged in a daring intelligence mission. His outstanding courage, aggressive determination and unfaltering devotion to duty served to inspire all who observed him and reflect great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 22, 1918 at Grand Lodge, Michigan. Home Town: Pontiac, Michigan. Death: KIA: December 6, 1950.

Frankville, Fredrick P.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Private First Class Fredrick P. Frankville, United States Marine Corps Reserve, for service as set forth in the following citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 April 1951.  When his unit was subjected to intense and accurate hostile automatic-weapons and small-arms fire from cleverly concealed bunkers, during an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Frankville fearlessly charged forward through the heavy fire to aid a wounded comrade lying in an exposed position within a few feet of the enemy and boldly delivered point-blank fire into the aperture of a hostile bunker.  Despite hand grenades bursting around him, he succeeded in carrying his wounded companion to a safe position and quickly rejoined his platoon in the final assault to overrun the enemy emplacements.  By his outstanding bravery, inspiring initiative and courageous devotion to duty, Private First Class Frankville contributed materially to the success of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Frattaroli, James J. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 173 - 12 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal James J. Frattaroli (ASN: RA-13282897), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. During the defense of the city the numerically superior enemy had infiltrated the battalion's positions and drove friendly forces from their guns. Corporal Frattaroli, accompanied by several others, returned to the position to retrieve the howitzers that had been left behind. With utter disregard for his personal safety and under intense artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, he attempted to retrieve the guns. In this heroic action, Corporal Frattaroli was killed. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Born: January 15, 1927. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: July 20, 1950.

Frazier, James Lowman (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant James Lowman Frazier (MCSN: 0-47425), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 April 1951. Leading his flight to the town of T'osan where he had located enemy supplies and trucks on a previous mission earlier the same day, First Lieutenant Frazier boldly pressed home his attack at extremely low altitude while subjected to intense hostile anti-aircraft fire. Although his plane as hit and caught fire during the determined assault, he continued his accurate bombing and strafing runs, dropping his napalm and skillfully firing his rockets into the target until his plane became unmanageable and crashed into the target area. By his courageous fighting spirit in the face of heavy enemy anti-aircraft fire, he contributed directly to the destruction of four hostile anti-aircraft guns positions, three trucks and two houses occupied by enemy gun crews. His outstanding leadership, professional skill and gallant devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Frazier and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 22, 1925 at Homer, Louisiana. Home Town: Harrisburg, Illinois. Death: KIA: April 30, 1951.

Frazzini, Norman Peter (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Norman Peter Frazzini (MCSN: 1156738), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman in Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. Joining a group of volunteers on a mission to evacuate casualties during patrol activities in a strongly fortified enemy-held sector, Private First Class Frazzini bravely made his way through a hail of fire from a well-camouflaged machine gun to assist a critically wounded Marine. Crawling into a ditch filled with enemy mines, he administered first aid to the stricken men and, although severely wounded in the arm by the hostile machine gun fire, continued to comfort his comrade until further assistance arrived on the scene. Refusing medical aid for himself, he continued to direct the evacuation of other casualties until he was hit a second time by enemy fire and mortally wounded. By his marked courage, fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Private First Class Frazzini upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 29, 1931 at Denver, Colorado. Home Town: Denver, Colorado. Death: KIA: September 12, 1951.

Fredell, Roger C.

Private First Class Roger C. Fredell, Battery A, 15th AAA AW Bn. (SP) displayed gallantry in action against on armed enemy at Hoengsong, Korea, on 13 February 1951. Private Fredell was performing his duties as cannoneer on an M.16 multiple machine gun half track, which was protecting a crossroads to permit passage of vehicles 01 a withdrawing task farce. During the night, the ammunition trailer of his M-16 was set on fire by enemy action. Private Fredell, despite heavy enemy fire, crawled onto the trailer to extinguish the blaze. Soon after his initial action, the trailer was struck by an enemy mortar shell which blew burning gasoline onto the M-16 tracks. Without regard for his own safety, Private Fredell braved intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire to extinguish the flames and in so doing was wounded by enemy fire. Saying nothing to his comrades about his wound, he resumed his post and kept the guns firing as the half track advanced on the enemy.  Subsequently he was seriously wounded and evacuated to a position of safety. Private Fredell's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service from Illinois.

Fredericks, Harold D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Harold D. Fredericks (MCSN: 0-49457), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. Assigned the mission of assaulting the left flank of an enemy-held ridge following a barrage which had pinned down his company during an assault against a strong hostile force of estimated battalion strength and occupying well-entrenched positions on a high, ice-covered hill in the vicinity of Sinhung-ni, First Lieutenant Fredericks moved forward after an air strike and mortar fire had been called on the hostile emplacements and, fearlessly exposing himself to the enemy's intense fire while leading his platoon over the open, frozen terrain which offered no cover or concealment, directed a brilliantly executed attack to seize the objective. Immediately effecting a skillful reorganization, he deployed his platoon in defensive positions and continued to direct and control its accurate and effective fire against the retreating enemy. By his daring and aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and superb combat tactics, First Lieutenant Fredericks served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed to the success achieved by his company. His staunch devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Staten Island, New York. Home Town: Staten Island, New York.

Fredrick, Charles D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Charles D. Fredrick (MCSN: 0-20599), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 November 1950. When his company was halted by an enemy roadblock and immediately subjected to intense hostile machine gun and small arms fire while proceeding in convoy through a steep-walled ravine, Captain Frederick continued to direct his unit in successfully beating off the enemy, despite painful wounds sustained in the initial stages of the action. By his skillful leadership and fighting spirit, he served to inspire his men to heroic efforts in destroying over sixty of the enemy and routing the remaining hostile force, thereby contributing materially to the success of his company. His marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Captain Fredrick and the United States Naval Service. Born: Hoboken, New Jersey. Home Town: Lyndhurst, New Jersey.

Freeman, Charles L.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - 1 November 1950

Sergeant Charles L. Freeman, RA15267414, Infantry, United States Army, while serving with the Heavy Mortar Company, 32d Infantry, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Seoul, Korea, during the period 23 September 1950 to 26 September 1950.  During this period, Sergeant Freeman, while acting as forward observer for the 2d Battalion, 32d Infantry, displayed great courage as he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as the battalion attacked South Mountain, Seoul, Korea.  Learning that Company G, 32d Infantry was in a grave situation, Sergeant Freeman voluntarily attached himself to the company to serve in the dual capacity of rifleman and forward observer.  When the company was attacked, Sergeant Freeman unhesitatingly exposed himself to withering enemy fire in order to more accurately direct fire on the enemy.  Further, he remained in position and killed twelve enemy soldiers.  By his courageous action he contributed materially to the enemy's defeat.  Sergeant Freeman's outstanding display of gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Ohio.

Freeman, Eugene D.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 73 - 22 March 1951

Captain Eugene D. Freeman, 01289064, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 14 February 1951, near Oya-ri, Korea, Captain Freeman was acting as forward observer for a heavy mortar company when it was attacked by an estimated regiment of enemy troops. Captain Freeman's observation post came under direct attack by an enemy band armed with automatic weapons and grenades. In spite of vigorous enemy opposition and his constant exposure to hostile observation and fire, Captain Freeman remained at his post directing mortar fire on the main body of the enemy troops. The mortar fire was so effective that approximately two hundred enemy were destroyed and the success of a subsequent friendly counter attack was assured. The courage, imperturbability, and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Freeman are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Freeman, John B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sonarman First Class John B. Freeman (NSN: 2249200), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in the rescue of wounded personnel aboard the U.S.S. Brush (DD-745), on 26 September 1950, when the BRUSH struck an enemy mine in North Korean waters. Sonarman First Class Freeman displayed exceptional courage and disregard for his own safety by entering the Magazine, Mess Hall, and Sonar Room in the damage area of the ship to rescue personnel through fire, smoke, fuel oil, and debris. He returned again and again to these spaces until he had removed all personnel in the face of electrical fires, heavy smoke and fumes. Sonarman First Class Freeman's courageous actions, at the risk of his own life, directly contributed to the prompt medical attention received by the wounded and their subsequent recover, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 4898 (May 20, 1951).

Freeman, Robert F.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 246 - 26 October 1950

Captain Robert F. Freeman, 044823, Artillery, 8th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  On 22 August 1950 near Tabudong, Korea, the regimental command post with which Captain Freeman was serving as artillery liaison officer was attacked by a strong enemy force.  Suddenly all communications with artillery fire direction center ceased.  Dashing through the intense mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire, Captain Freeman made his way 300 yards to the fire direction center and ascertained that a direct hit had demolished the installation.  Returning to the command post despite twice being knocked down by exploding shells, he reported the vital information to the commanding officer, thus enabling the artillery to establish immediately an alternate fire direction center which furnished successful close support to the regiment and assisted it to effect complete defeat of the attackers.  Captain Freeman's initiative and courageous devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from South Carolina.

Freer, Anton Joseph (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Anton Joseph Freer (MCSN: 1050269), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Although wounded in the knee and his rifle destroyed when his platoon was subjected to heavy hostile small arms and machine gun fire while attacking strong enemy positions, Private First Class Freer snatched a submachine gun from a dead enemy soldier and continued to lead his fire team in the assault. Personally directing and delivering accurate and effective fire upon the enemy, he materially aided his unit in inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and in successfully seizing the objective before he was fatally wounded by hostile fire. By his outstanding leadership, cool courage and selfless devotion to duty throughout, Private First Class Freer upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 5, 1929 at Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA: November 29, 1950.

Freitas, Joseph L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Joseph L. Freitas, Jr. (MCSN: 0-20266), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 September 1952. Receiving an urgent request for a helicopter evacuation for a critically wounded Marine, Major Freitas immediately left the main squadron base and skillfully piloted his aircraft through total darkness and intense fog to a position directly over the helicopter strip at the battalion command post. Despite the lack of communications and the increasing density of the fog, he expertly guided the helicopter, with the aid of only two ordinary flashlights, to the otherwise invisible strip. After receiving the casualty, he again flew his aircraft through the heavy fog and successfully evacuated the severely wounded man. By his superb airmanship, outstanding courage and inspiring initiative, Major Freitas was instrumental in saving the life of a fellow Marine and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Turlock, California. Home Town: Merced, California.

French, Daniel L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 123 - 9 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Daniel L. French (ASN: 0-2200201), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 9 July 1950 at Noechan-ni, Korea. The 1st Battalion was under heavy enemy fire for several hours when word was received that a large enemy group had moved into a position nearby and was about to attack the Command Post. Lieutenant French personally placed the personnel in positions of defense. Under heavy enemy fire he ran and crawled from man to man giving first aid to the wounded and encouraging the men to hold their positions. The enemy frequently attempted to overrun the position and each time Lieutenant French moved to the center of the threat to lead a counter attack and each time succeeded in beating the enemy back. Because of his utter disregard for his personal safety and outstanding courage and leadership the Command Post with its vital communications net and medical aid station was saved. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Lieutenant French reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Springfield, Massachusetts.

Frey, Edward Ivan Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Edward Ivan Frey, Jr. (NSN: 0-384274), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while attached to and serving with Underwater Demolition Team ONE, engaged in beach reconnaissance on the west coast of Korea. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Frey particularly distinguished himself in the face of the enemy. Serving as Officer-in-Charge of a UDT beach party which was attacked by guerrilla elements, he heroically organized and directed the withdrawal of his party from the beach. While under hostile fire, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Frey although armed only with a pistol, returned the enemy's fire in order to allow his unit to enter the water and drag their rubber boat toward an LCVP approaching the beach. After expending his ammunition he assisted in swimming another member of his unit to the pick-up area. In exposing himself to secure a line from the LCVP to the rubber boat, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Frey was wounded about the face by shrapnel. Despite his wounds he coolly continued to counsel his men and direct them to safer locations until such time as he was hit again and mortally wounded. His outstanding bravery, gallantry and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 572 (June 8, 1951. Born: June 8, 1923. Home Town: McKeesport, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: January 19, 1951.

Fridriksson, MSGT Thorvaldur "Thorva"

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 105 - 16 December 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant Thorvaldur "Thorva" Fridriksson, RA37805267, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 27 September 1950 near Kochang, Korea. On that date Sergeant Fridriksson was loading a motorized patrol which was reconnoitering roads and bridges between Kochang and Muju. Twenty miles north of Kochang the patrol encountered an enemy force of approximately 75, equipped with small arms, a T-45 tank and a field piece. Sergeant Fridriksson boldly decided to attack with his outnumbered patrol and fearlessly moved forward. In the ensuing action, the enemy was driven off leaving their equipment behind. He then dispatched a squad to pursue the retreating enemy, while he directed the destruction of the enemy materiel. His skillful deployments of his force and bold initiative in attacking a numerically superior force resulted in 25 enemy dead, 8 enemy soldiers captured, the destruction of all enemy equipment including small arms abandoned by the fleeing enemy, without a single casualty to his patrol. The gallantry and skillful leadership displayed on this occasion by Master Sergeant Fridriksson reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Hennepin County, Minnesota.

Friesen, Clarence W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Clarence W. Friesen (MCSN: 0-49949), United States Marine Corps for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 December 1950. Assigned a mission to seize a strongly defended, snow-covered enemy hill which commanded the division's main supply route, Second Lieutenant Friesen, exposing himself to devastating hostile fire, led an assault on the position and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, skillfully directed their fires. Although sustaining a severe head wound which paralyzed his left arm and side, he refused evacuation and, inspiring his platoon to rout the entrenched enemy, consented to medical treatment only after the position had been secured and a defense line established. By his valiant fighting spirit, exceptional fortitude and determination, Second Lieutenant Friesen contributed immeasurably to the success achieved by the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Encampment, Wyoming. Home Town: Pine Bluff, Wyoming.

Frisbie, Varge G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Varge G. Frisbie (MCSN: 0-32877), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing a hill defended by a large enemy force in well-constructed emplacements and bunkers, Captain Frisbie repeatedly moved about the area in the face of devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire to direct and control the attack and to supervise the use of supporting arms. When a sudden enemy counterattack on one flank threatened the attack and the entire battalion line, he fearlessly exposed himself to the heavy fire to shout words of encouragement to his men on the endangered flank, inspiring them to contain the attack and repulse the enemy. By his outstanding leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and marked courage, Captain Frisbie contributed directly to the successful seizure of the company objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cadillac, Michigan. Home Town: Rockford, Illinois.

Fromme, Moritz P. Jr. (2nd award)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 550 - 26 November 26 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Moritz P. Fromme, Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as a helicopter pilot, Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, in action near Korang-pori, Korea, on 19 May 1951. Hearing that a United Nations pilot was in distress and unable to return to friendly territory in his damaged aircraft, Lieutenant Fromme flew his unarmed and highly vulnerable H-5 helicopter fifty miles into enemy held territory to make the rescue. Approaching the locale of the downed pilot, the helicopter was subjected to a barrage of enemy small arms fire. Determined to rescue the pilot, Lieutenant Fromme directed friendly fighters to the area in an attempt to neutralize the enemy fire as he descended. As he reached a lower altitude, his helicopter was struck and seriously damaged. Despite the damage, Lieutenant Fromme continued his descent, landed and rescued the pilot from certain capture. The gallantry, disregard for personal safety, and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Fromme were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Fujita, Takeshi

25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 - 3 November 1950

Award of the Silver Star - By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named enlisted man:

Private First Class Takeshi Fujita, RA10103842, Infantry, Company A, 5th Infantry United States Army.  Having been assigned the mission of seizing a strategic hill in the vicinity of Sobuk-San, Korea on 29 August 1950, Private First Class Fujita's platoon deployed to attack but were halted by the intense fire from numerically superior hostile forces occupying the hill.  Despite the withering enemy fire, Private First Class Fujita arose, and firing his automatic weapon and urging on his comrades advanced on the enemy position until seriously wounded.  His conspicuous courage inspired his platoon to rout the enemy and seize the objective.  Private First Class Fujita's selfless devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from the Territory of Hawaii.

Fullen, Robert L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 116 - 3 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) Robert L. Fullen (ASN: 0-840368), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 16 July 1950, near the Kum River, Korea. Lieutenant Fullen was a forward observer. Despite the infiltration of enemy ground troops into the area of his observation post, Lieutenant Fullen remained in position and continued to relay fire data to his firing batteries. He completely disregarded his own safety and ignored the heavy fire which was falling on his observation post. He was wounded and refused to be evacuated. When last seen, Lieutenant Fullen was still in position directing fire on enemy personnel and installations. By these gallant acts, Lieutenant Fullen brought the highest credit to himself and the military service. Home Town: Rebecca, Georgia.

Fuller, Clarence H.

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 278 - 13 July 1951

First Lieutenant Clarence H. Fuller, 01332051, Infantry, Company "K" 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 6 December 1950, near Majong-Dong, Korea, Lieutenant Fuller voluntarily led a patrol to determine enemy dispositions and strength on a small hill to the unit's front. After approaching to within 300 yards of the enemy, the patrol was suddenly subjected to intense hostile fire. Lieutenant Fuller deliberately exposed himself in an effort to locate the enemy guns. When a mortar section arrived to lend vital fire support, he directed a concentrated barrage on hostile machine gun positions. Observing two enemy soldiers fleeing from an emplacement, Lieutenant Fuller fired his carbine at them, killing one and wounding the other. As soon as the volume of enemy fire began to decrease, Lieutenant Fuller ordered his patrol to withdraw, but he remained and directed mortar fire until the supply of ammunition was expended. After ordering the mortar section to withdraw, he discovered that one of his men was severely wounded and unable to move. Hurrying back to the company, he organized a rescue party and returned for the stricken soldier, successfully evacuating him to safety. Lieutenant Fuller's outstanding gallantry and fearless leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Minnesota.

Fuller, Clifford C.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 316 - 5 August 1953

Private First Class Clifford C. Fuller, US51156977, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 13 June and during the early morning hours of 14 June 1953, Company "G" set out to assault enemy positions on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. When three highly effective assaults had been met by the enemy with intense mortar and artillery fire, the order to return to safety was given. Private Fuller, an automatic rifleman, observed enemy soldiers moving toward some comrades who had become casualties in the close quarter fighting which had taken place. He immediately exposed himself to heavy artillery, mortar and grenade fire as he charged to the crest of the hill. There, he halted the enemy with accurate and effective fire while the casualties were recovered.  He remained in this position until the last man had been evacuated. Private Fuller's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Massachusetts.

Fuller, Robert C. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Robert C. Fuller, Jr. (NSN: 0-432656), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during mine sweeping operations at Wonsan in the Korean theater during the period 10 to 31 October 1950. As Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Partridge (AMS-31), and while sweeping enemy mine fields in the face of heavy fire from enemy coast defense batteries, by his inspiring leadership and professional competence, he contributed directly to the efficient operation of his ship and the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950).

Funaro, Nicholas M.

Corporal Nicholas M. Funaro, Headquarters & Headquarters 8attery, 3rd AAA AW 8attalion (SP), 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 5 February 1951, near Suwon, Korea, while on patrol, Corporal Funaro, a driver of an armored personnel carrier, voluntarily left his vehicle without hesitation and with complete disregard for his personal safety, and ran through intense small arms and mortar fire to a nearby tank. He removed a wounded officer, carried him through a hail of fire to the safety of his vehicle. Corporal Funaro's gallant action saved the officer's life and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military from New York.

 

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